ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

GenderSubscribe to Gender

Seven Kinds of Deprivation That Women Face Everyday

Patriarchal structures have ensured that women’s access to resources, health, education, and political representation among other things, have remained heavily unequal.

What Survivors of Domestic Violence Need from Their New Government

This article discusses the problems with the current domestic violence act and discusses what a new government can do to alleviate the sufferings of a large section of women who are struggling to enforce court orders.

Do Women and Men Have 'Sexed' Brains?

The brain and the mind are fascinating for feminism, given that oppression has been normalised by referencing to the brain. This article attempts to accumulate knowledge generated by the field of neurofeminism, and searches for an association between doing feminism and the sciences.

How Are Women Represented in Urdu Print Media?

Very few attempts have been made to analyse the representation of women and gender power relations in the Urdu print media in India. This article attempts a content analysis of the popular weekly newspaper, Nai Duniya.

Waste Pickers and the ‘Right to Waste’ in an Indian City

Waste belongs to households and then to the municipality once it enters the public collection/disposal system. What does this mean for informal waste pickers? Despite their numbers and importance, they lack a “right to waste” and are vulnerable to processes of accumulation. This paper presents the counter-narrative of Solid Waste Collection and Handling, India’s first wholly self-owned cooperative of waste pickers, which has been contracted by the Pune Municipal Corporation for door-to-door waste collection. The initiative legitimises a “right to waste” for waste pickers by allowing them direct access to waste from households, and has reconceptualised waste and work for waste pickers, while altering their engagement with other stakeholders.

Home as the Frontier

In conflict zones, the home–outside binary is often erased in practice as violence enters people’s lives and personal spaces, diluting any distinction between combatants and non-combatants, even as the international humanitarian law and Geneva Conventions highlight the distinction. In Kashmir, a popular armed rebellion against the state, since 1989, has been met with brutal force. Making use of militarised masculinity to inflict violence on bodies and psyches of the people considered to be the “other” has been a norm. In extending the understanding of the front line from the border to homes, actions, bodies, and the everyday trauma that women face, the victimhood narrative is problematised by placing women as frontliners as they witness, survive, and resist.

#MeToo: An International Conversation on Sexual Violence Impacting Feminist Discourse Across Borders

This article looks at the linkages between popular mobilisations against violence with a focus on the specific mobilisation of the #MeToo Movement that addresses a form of violence against women—sexual harassment. It traces the emergence of a new activism that is based on access to and use of social media as a platform for change and its outcomes.

#MeToo Is A Crucial Moment to Revisit the History of Indian Feminism

In the wake of #MeToo, the time is ripe to revisit the history of Indian feminism, in particular the idea of “waves.” Throughout this history, we see how Indian feminism has emerged as an object of internal contestation, with disputes about issues becoming grounds to question and redefine feminism itself.

Widows of Farmer Suicide Victims in Vidarbha

Farmer suicides due to agricultural distress are a tenacious and recurring tragedy that plunge the lives of the unprepared widows into chaos. First, the widows must struggle to survive in the same circumstances that claimed the lives of their husbands, but with much less experience and guidance. Second, the widows must emerge from entrenched invisibility imposed upon them by the state, the community, and even the family. However, the study of five widows of the farmer suicides across a decade in Vidarbha reveals differential dependence and autonomy. The widow-headed households of earlier cases appear to succeed with time as compared to the later cases, and mostly through their own individual agency. The study, originally conducted through the years 2014–17 in 18 villages of six tehsils of two districts of Vidarbha, also points to normalisation of distress of widows that leads to their continuous exclusion from the state understanding of farmer suicides.

What Does it Mean to be a Hijra Mother?

Hijras are known as the “third gender” in India. This article aims to understand hijra motherhood, “natural” motherhood, and womanhood in context of a recent advertisement. The author questions the false binaries of sex and gender through hijra subjectivities.

Pages

Back to Top