ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Gender DiscriminationSubscribe to Gender Discrimination

Violence in Times of COVID-19 Lack of Legal Protection for Women Informal Workers

The present article is contextualised within the increasing cases of violence and harassment in the lives of women workers in the informal sector and deeply entrenched labour market discrimination in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The article tries to analyse the impact of the pandemic particularly on the women workers in the informal sector through an examination of existing legal protection measures, access to social security and the issue of violence and harassment.

Neither Moral Nor Policing

The police surveillance on young people in Kerala seems to have risen to new heights with active monitoring of youth lifestyles, which the police perceive to be linked to youth crime. These micro-fascisms only reveal the growing weakness of the pillars of 20th century Malayalee social disciplining. It is up to the politicised youth, however, to turn this into an opportunity for democratic transformation.

Confronting Gender Discrimination in Punjab

The 2011 Census revealed the welcome fact that both the child sex ratio and the overall sex ratio in Punjab had improved considerably over the previous census data. However, subsequent rounds of National Family Health Survey data show that gender bias against the girl child in terms of health coverage and nutrition is not only higher than in the developed states but also the poorer ones. The central and state governments need to take note of this aspect in policymaking.

State of Primary Education in West Bengal

Successive efforts initiated by the Left Front government have played a positive role in the expansion of primary education in West Bengal. However, as the findings of this study establish, certain problems still prevail. Poor attendance, perceived class differences, poverty and gender discrimination prevent socially underprivileged groups from accessing education opportunities. On the other hand, the success of the government's experiment in providing cost-effective primary education, particularly to the most underprivileged sections of society must be recognised.

Globalisation, Information Technology and Asian Indian Women in US

The experiences recounted in this essay of Asian Indian women on an H-1B or H 4 visa highlight the deepening contradiction between economic restructuring and the emancipatory potential it offers women in the labour market. The women respondents in this study are either confined to the domestic sphere in conformance to ideals of 'Hindu' motherhood or suffer from the assumption of the labour market that an ideal worker has no family - an assumption that makes their software programmer husbands in contrast rise to dizzying heights in their profession. What emerges in turn is the perpetuation of masculinity myths and gender stereotypes in guiding behavioural and thought patterns even in a hi-tech sector as the software industry.
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