ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

FeminisationSubscribe to Feminisation

Literary Cultures in North East India

The history of a community’s literature has usually been inseparable from the history of the language in which the literature is produced. In North East India, the problem arises in the case of those communities which have a rich and vibrant oral tradition, but no written texts. When writers from these communities adopt a literary language which is alien to their culture, they have to understand the historical conditions that enable them to use that language. The literary cultures in this region have witnessed a gradual shrinking of frontiers from the trans-regional vernaculars to a confined and limited regional space, where atomisation of cultures is more visible than development of cosmopolitan vernaculars.

Why Wage Differences Exist across Sectors?

Inter-industry differences in wages are substantial, and over time, they do not seem to be disappearing. Productivity is a determinant of wage differences across industries, though the association between them is not very strong at the aggregate level or for intermediate goods, capital goods, and consumer non-durables. Trade liberalisation enhances productivity and wages at the aggregate level, and also in the case of basic goods and capital goods. However, in an attempt to raise productivity, firms may extract more work from those who are already engaged, and tend to pay them less than their due share in certain industry groups. Contractualisation and feminisation show similar effects for all the industry groups except the intermediate goods industries, and has a worsening effect on wages and also productivity.

Land, Labour and Power

Based on the restudy in 2012-14 of Jamgod in Dewas district of Madhya Pradesh, which was first studied by Adrian C Mayer in the 1950s, an overview of changes in landownership and use, and the relations of labour and production are presented. Locating the analysis at the intersection of land and labour, the aim is to explore how local power structures and personal aspirations have transformed.

Flexible Production, Feminisation and Disorganisation

The paper argues that central to the export success of the Tiruppur industry has been the feminisation and the demographic segmentation of the labour force brought about through the disorganisation and reorganisation of production structure and labour process. Young and married women workers constitute about half of the workforce in the industry, concentrated in the lower rungs of production organisation. A direct outcome of the process of feminisation has been its impact on labour relations of the industry, marked by the informalisation of the workers.

Redefining and Feminising Security

Issues of security have all too often focused on military aspects, emphasising elements of 'masculinisation'. But for long lasting solutions, it is necessary to involve groups that have remained 'marginal' so far - in particular the women's movements and action forums. A gender-based perspective could offer radical solutions, as women's viewpoints, attitudes and 'coping strategies' - as seen in Northern Ireland and South Africa, could bring in far-reaching, positive and provide durable security in the long run.
Back to Top