ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Farm Laws

The possibilities for extension of the minimum support prices to ensure a decentralised procurement system in a diverse range of crops are discussed. How the architecture of this system in partnership with the private sector can be developed and how this could be made market-facing without compromising the primary interests of the farmers is also looked at.

The Incarceration of Conscience

Arrests represent the current dispensation’s tendency to use coercion over deliberation.

The Government’s Retreat from Agricultural Policy

The Government of Bihar repealed the Agricultural Produce Market Committee (APMC) Act in 2006 intending to encourage private parties in agricultural marketing, which was supposed to provide more options to farmers to sell their produce. The experience from the state suggests that repealing the APMC Act did not persuade private entities to set up agricultural markets. This saw the number of mandis remaining stagnant, and with poor agricultural market density combined with negligible public procurement, it led to a lower price realisation by farmers in the state.

An Act of Judicial Disingenuity

The Supreme Court’s intervention ( Rakesh Vaishnav v Union of India 2021) in the ongoing protests and debate over the three controversial “farm laws” 1 has been met with a storm of criticism (Hegde 2021; Yamunan 2021). It has “stayed the implementation” of the three farm laws “until further orders...

MSP in a Changing Agricultural Policy Environment

The minimum support price and the public procurement system are indispensable for national food security, public distribution system, farmer livelihood and welfare, and agricultural growth. Over time, the MSP regime has been beleaguered with weaknesses. Thus, agricultural reforms are essential to rectify these primarily by firming the government’s role in agricultural marketing to ensure farmer welfare. However, the new farm laws foster a policy environment based on the laissez-faire approach that will be inimical to farmers’ interests.

Indian State and the Future of Agriculture

The government intervention puts Indian agriculture in the grip of corporates.
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