ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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China’s New Rules for Algorithms

A set of draft rules released by the Cyberspace Administration of China, to regulate algorithm-empowered recommendation activities on the internet, are congruent with the demands made by civil societies worldwide and more substantive than the actions proposed or taken by the governments in western liberal democracies.

Data Privacy and Competition Law at the Crossroads

The recent case of WhatsApp changing its data privacy laws is analysed as an example of issues emerging with competition law. Much has been written about the absence of data privacy laws in India that is likely to leave consumers vulnerable to sudden policy changes by service providers like WhatsApp. In this context, it is argued that informed consent from consumers is unlikely to be present and rather than depending on data privacy laws, it should be competition law that can ensure minimum harm to consumers and prevent adverse effects on market competition.

​Rethinking the Democratic Dilemma

Viewing tech giants like Facebook and Twitter as principal agents of free speech has far-reaching consequences on the health and functioning of a democracy.

Posthumanist Confinement

The idea of tech companies as an important power in the creation of what Gilles Deleuze called “societies of control” is explored, building on which contemporary posthumanism is looked at as human existence represented and replicated as non-human entities. The practice of “digital eugenics” by tech...

Privacy and Manipulation: How Social Media Has Affected Political Discourse

As our interactions with social media and messaging apps become more and more pervasive, does our data remain private or can it be used by algorithms to tailor and manipulate our online experience?

Digital Politics in India’s 2019 General Elections

India’s 2019 general election was the first national election contested within a truly digital consumption society, wherein approximately half the voting population had access to digital pathways, and another one-third had access to social media. This article argues that what happens on digital platforms is no longer an externality or an adjunct to offline politics—it is constitutive of it and inseparable from larger political mobilisation.

The Feigned Lives of Facebook

Art and philosophy can show the way for a social media that embraces life in its totality, allowing for the projection of our true selves on social media.

Breaking up Tech Giants

The economic power wielded by tech giants has been aided and abetted by the lax enforcement of antitrust regulations by the United States. It has allowed them to create an almost impassable moat around their businesses, while being able to bully, browbeat, and buy out any competitors who look remotely threatening. Calls by politicians to break up these tech giants are more than timely and need to be taken seriously by regulators across the world.

India's Data Protection Framework Will Need to Treat Privacy as a Social and Not Just an Individual Good

The idea that technological innovations may compete with privacy of individuals assumes that there is social and/or economic good in allowing unrestricted access to data. However, it must be remembered that data is potentially a toxic asset, if it is not collected, processed, secured and shared in the appropriate way.

The Next Internet Bust?

Facebook's recent colossal acquisition of WhatsApp is yet another sign that we are now in the middle of a new internet bubble. This bubble is different from that of the late 1990s in that it is being driven by excess liquidity in the system and the search for the "next big thing" like Google and Facebook.
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