ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Anti-Trafficking Bill 2018 Fails to Address Changing Forms of Labour Exploitation

The recently passed Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill, 2018 is woefully unaware of the present context of globalisation and the changing forms of labour dispossession and exploitation.

Japanese Occupation of Nicobar Islands

Primarily based on archival research, especially an unpublished diary of Nicobarese stalwart leader John Richardson, this article gives a glimpse of the sufferings that the Nicobarese endured under the Japanese colonial regime during World War II. The regime exposed the indigenes to war, slavery, torture, and executions. At the same time it engendered leadership in the Nicobar Islands which consolidated these historically isolated people into a community and ended their prolonged economic and sexual exploitation.

Reflections on the ‘Chalo Nagpur’ Campaign

The ‘Chalo Nagpur’ campaign mobilised thousands of women marchers and drew attention to not only the exploitation and violence suffered by women from the lower castes, classes and marginalised sections but also their efforts to build connections with women engaged in similar aims across the world.

Revisiting Agrarian Bihar

Social Power and Everyday Class Relations: Agrarian Transformation in North Bihar by Anand Chakravarti; Sage Publications, New Delhi, 2001; pp 311, Rs 525.

Shalishi in West Bengal

Traditional community/village level dispute resolution systems still coexist with formal processes of justice and administration. The `shalishi' is one such method of arbitration in West Bengal that has been used by NGOs to intervene effectively in settling domestic violence cases. Shalishi scores over the more formal legal avenues of dispute resolution because of its informal set up. But deriving its legitimacy as it does from the conventional norms and values of the community it works in favour of keeping the family intact, often compromising feminist notions of empowerment.

The Other Side of Foreign Investment by Imperial Powers

In the era of the rise of industrial capitalism and its development in western Europe and the USA the transfer of part of the income from the major colonies played a critical part in boosting investment in western Europe and allowing enormous amounts of investment to be directed towards sustenance of the mass migration of Europeans to overseas colonies such as the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa. However, the size and even the direction of the flow of surpluses have been obscured by the usual methods of calculating the value of foreign trade from the mercantilist era down to the present. The author's recalculation of the surplus extracted by Britain from India and Burma demystifies the astonishment expressed by most commentators about the very large proportion British foreign investemnt formed of its GDP and the apparently perverse desire of the British to retain an empire which was less profitable than, say, investment in the USA. The realisation of the enormous surplus was an integral part of the mechanism by which the white-settled colonies were populated and equipped and therefore could not be treated as a substitute for that process.
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