ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Epidemics and Infectious DiseasesSubscribe to Epidemics and Infectious Diseases

Burden of Infectious Diseases

Diseases like the H1N1 flu pose major challenges because of the continuing neglect of public health.

Ebola and India

While the chances of the Ebola virus entering India are low, Ebola and pandemic flu teach us to expect the unexpected and be prepared. New diseases are appearing in the world again and again. We live today in a "global village". Ebola-infected bats are probably present in Asia. Nipah virus-infected bats are widely prevalent in east Asia; there is no guarantee their territorial flight paths will not extend to peninsular India. Is India prepared? Who exactly is in charge?

In the Time of Ebola

Sound healthcare systems are the only insurance against deadly viruses.

Health, Illness and Disease

The conceptions of disease and its formulation under different paradigms have made it clear that the approach towards health and medicine has never been completely detached from ecology. Health and disease are thought to be the products of the interaction among three key elements: the agent, the host, and the environment. This paper is an attempt to develop an approach that encompasses the concerns surrounding an understanding of disease ecology and a patient's behaviour during treatment. Using the example of tuberculosis patients put under DOTS, which disregards the patient's say in decision-making, it analyses the implications for the larger health issue using the political ecology approach.

The Ever-Mutating Enemy

Tuberculosis is spreading with renewed vigour globally as are its more virulent strains like multi-drug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB. Even as the bacteria mutates and there is urgent need to deal with the many inadequacies of the present treatment regimen, new drugs backed by innovative research are conspicuously absent. A new candidate anti-TB drug proposed to be tried by the Open Source Drug Discovery initiative with the Council of Scientifi c and Industrial Research offers a ray of hope.

India Needs a National Policy to Control Tuberculosis

There is no policy in India for tuberculosis control and the centrally-run Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme has neither mandate nor agenda for TB control. There are short, medium and long term remedies for the maladies of the revised programme which are detailed in this article. TB is both a biomedical and a social, cultural and economic problem. Citizens must demand a national policy for TB control.

Polio Elimination: A Response

In Manoj Grover’s letter “Polio Elimination” (EPW, 17 May 2014) on two points in my article “Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?” (EPW, 5 April 2014), the writer seems to answer the question in the negative, saying: “I cannot imagine any internal [read Indian]...

Polio Elimination

In the article titled “Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?” by T Jacob John (EPW, 5 April 2014), the author makes a comment that India would have eliminated polio decades ago had it used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in the universal immunisation programme...

Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?

Overcoming formidable biological and sociocultural barriers, India eliminated wild polioviruses from its territory in January 2011. Looking back, it is obvious that the best policy would have been to introduce the inactivated poliovirus vaccine to prevent polio in every vaccinated child, and to use oral poliovirus vaccine by pulse campaigns to eliminate WPVs rapidly. This would have eliminated polio decades ago. Now that WPVs have been eliminated, IPV must be introduced as a prelude to withdrawing OPV. The road ahead is bumpy, but with the important lessons learnt so far, India can no longer pretend that it is too difficult to design a permanent public health infrastructure to control other communicable and non-communicable diseases.

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