ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Conceptualising Globalisation

There is hardly any unanimity in the theoretical formulations on globalisation. While on one hand, the excessive use of the term as a sociological concept has largely emptied it of any analytical and explanatory value, most observations are based on a dominant economic framework. This paper argues that for an empirical study of globalisation to be strong, it requires to be grounded on clear measures of globalisation, those that are based on broader areas of social implications as well as its impact on various aspects of human life.

Science, Astrology, and Democratic Society

The proposal of the University Grants Commission (UGC) to start courses in astrology has drawn predictable responses. These have by and large opposed astrology because it is not ‘scientific’, thereby unthinkingly and uncritically valorise ‘science’ as it is practised and taught. Both the content and utility of science, in their arguments, are sacrificed at the altar of method and procedure. Astrology, it is being said, cannot be introduced in universities because they cannot meet the scientific standards of reliability, validity, and falsification among others. At the same time, the larger context in which astrology is located in Indian (read Hindu) society is ignored. This discussion is based on articles in the media, many written by leading scientists, criticising the UGC proposal.
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