ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Estimates of High GDP Growth for 2015-16

In producing the new series, the Central Statistics Office with its rebased National Accounts Statistics has done a studious job of marshalling diverse sources of data and weaving them together into a composite new source. However, the final picture of NAS data would have been more acceptable if better caution was exercised in using new concepts as well as new sources of data, and in weighing the growth results against frequent and extensive revisions. The CSO has failed to refine the growth results juxtaposed against the repetitive and substantial revisions that the data sources have impelled and have completely ignored the analytical construct of gross domestic product at factor cost.

Horizontal Imbalances in India

Horizontal imbalances (measured by the coefficient of variation in own revenue as a percentage of total expenditure) persist in India even today mainly due to a host of economic and political factors. Variations in tax base, tax effort, infrastructural facilities - both physical and social - and political uncertainty are found to be the important determinants of horizontal imbalances. The dispersion in horizontal imbalance can only be reduced through all-round development of the poorer states. General-purpose transfers from the centre are essential for horizontal equity but they cannot ensure a permanent solution.

Dichotomy or Continuum

Spatial dimension of development continues to be a neglected area in economic analysis. As a consequence, the traditional models of development fail to explain the growing imbalance in space as also the widening gaps in levels of socio-economic development between the city and its periphery. The objective of the present paper is to analyse if indeed the distance of a village from the nearest town has a systematic impact on its socio-economic characteristics.The distributional pattern of the indicators of economic well-being, health, education, etc, shows that their values do not necessarily decline along smooth gradients, as we move from the city/town to its periphery.

Privatisation: Theory and Evidence

Privatisation is very much the flavour of the day. Many enthusiasts of privatisation seem to believe that a shift from public to private ownership will automatically make for improved performance. Yet there is little in economic theory or the empirical evidence on privatisation that lends support to such a simplistic belief. The evidence on the impact of privatisation is by no means unmixed. In particular, in less developed countries, where law enforcement and corporate governance tend to be weak, private ownership does not necessarily make for better performance. It is possible, based on the research on privatisation, to draw some tentative conclusions for privatisation policy in a context such as ours.

Consequences of Affirmative Action in US Higher Education

This paper seeks to contribute to greater mutual understanding of positive discrimination in India and the US by describing and reviewing some important empirical work that has recently been carried out to evaluate the effects of affirmative action in the US higher education. Until recently the debate on the wisdom of positive discrimination policies has been largely theoretical, appealing to ethical considerations and political-philosophical values. Now, however, systematic empirical evidence on the long-term consequences of affirmative action policies in admissions to US colleges and universities has at last been made available and can be brought to bear on the discussion.

Fertility Transition in Karnataka

Using data from official statistics, census and surveys, this paper traces fertility transition of Karnataka and explains factors responsible for slow pace in comparison to other south Indian states. There exist considerable regional disparities with regard to health and demographic indicators. Fertility decline has been faster in southern and coastal regions, and at a tardy pace in backward northern districts characterised by low literacy, low female age at marriage, poor health infrastructure and low status of women.

Impact of Increase in Oil Prices on Inflation and Output in India

This paper attempts to study the transmission mechanism of an increase in petroleum prices on the prices of other commodities and output in India. The paper also examines the nature and the extent of 'feedback' in such a transmission mechanism and obtains evidence of bidirectional causality between oil and non-oil inflation in India.
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