ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Economics

M Kunhaman (1949–2023)

M Kunhaman consciously rooted himself in the tradition of the scientific method initiated by Jotirao Phule and B R Ambedkar from a caste/subaltern point of view. The continuing influence of his work on tribal communities in Kerala and intra-regional economic analysis is such that it can be considered as a marker that divides the historiography and research on the Adivasis of Kerala into two—works which came before it and works hich came after.

Inflation Theory Comes Full Circle

A public interchange among some leading macroeconomists suggests a change in the way inflation is perceived by the profession. It is increasingly being recognised that inflation can be the outcome of a conflict over income, reflected in the continuous attempt by the firms to raise prices and by the workers to raise wages in order to gain a larger share of it. At least some part of the inflation in India can be seen as a conflict over income shares and sketches a theory of inflation suited to its economy. Against this background, the effectiveness of inflation targeting is touched upon—the inflation-control strategy of the Reserve Bank of India—and the necessary steps to curb inflationary pressure in India are pointed out.

Dynamics of Economic Growth in India

Using a model based on the Stojanovic’s matrix of growth to understand India’s economic progress shows that the service sector has been the dominant mover of the economy after the start of the reforms in 1990–91. The growth pattern, according to the matrix of growth, can be interpreted as maximising long-run efficiency, and hence, it might be an appropriate investment policy to approximate the output proportions generated using the matrix of growth.

 

The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Formal Sector Crisis in IT and ITeS

The information technology and information technology-enabled services sector in India have largely been opaque, with little known about its social profile, work conditions, and office culture. The sector hides its everyday workings behind massive revenue figures and the number of jobs in the organised sector it has created. What slips through the cracks is the precarious nature of these permanent jobs and the shocking ineffectiveness of employee protections. These vulnerabilities, built into the employment and work culture of the sector, acquired a nightmarish quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. With most IT companies being forced to shift their employees to work-from-home formats, it is crucial to study how these vulnerabilities have affected the latter. This paper draws upon media reports, a short online survey, and telephonic interviews to highlight the working conditions in the IT and ITeS sector, the experience of working from home, and the overall state of its permanent employment.