ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

EbolaSubscribe to Ebola

Lockdown and Reopening the Economy

This article explores the spatial dynamics of COVID-19—with nationwide and partial lockdowns’ in its two waves, respectively—in India by employing the location quotient and univariate Moran’s I statistics with various variables representing spatial adjacency, proximity, population, population density, urbanisation, migration, and health infrastructure variables. The results suggest that though geographical proximity to the hotspot states played an important role in triggering the outbreak during both the waves, it could not influence the spatial clustering at the sluggish phase of the pandemic.

Ebola Virus Disease

The Ebola virus disease, which spread in four West African countries, brought to light the feeble health governance system not only in these countries but also at the global level. Weak health infrastructure, resource crunch, non-viability of preventive and curative medication, and distrust of foreign interventions among people not only aggravated the crisis but also led to a schizophrenic portrayal of the disease across the world. A lack of any preventive medication for Ebola--despite a history of recurrence over the last four decades--is a big question confronting health research communities, pharmaceutical companies and global health governing agencies. The recent outbreak of Ebola and a global security threat perception associated with the disease have given rise to many debates, one of them being the debate on medical ethics in a public health emergency. All the ethical issues related with the unavailability of medication, launch of untested medicine in affected areas and also the delay in decision-making and response are the core arguments which this article tries to analyse.

Ebola and India

While the chances of the Ebola virus entering India are low, Ebola and pandemic flu teach us to expect the unexpected and be prepared. New diseases are appearing in the world again and again. We live today in a "global village". Ebola-infected bats are probably present in Asia. Nipah virus-infected bats are widely prevalent in east Asia; there is no guarantee their territorial flight paths will not extend to peninsular India. Is India prepared? Who exactly is in charge?

Health Workers in the Time of Ebola

This letter is in response to the editorial, “In the Time of Ebola” (EPW, 8 November 2014). Among the many relevant points, the editorial mentions the shortage of healthcare workers in the Ebola-affected countries in west Africa. This problem has been worsened by the high fatality rate among health...
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