ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Political Economy of Drug Quality

This paper presents an analysis of the political economy forces underlying the new conceptualisation of drug quality in the Indian pharmaceutical industry, consequent upon the process of globalisation and liberalisation and a stricter IPR regime. It examines how these forces have shaped the increasingly complex construction of drug quality, both globally and in India. It also comes up with a comprehensive multidimensional definition of drug quality incorporating a range of parameters.

Structural Reforms and Health Equity

Preliminary results of an analysis of data sets on morbidity and health care utilisation from two NSS surveys in the 1980s and 1990s together with empirical results of other studies points the worsening of class-based inequalities in access to health services for both men and women. While gender inequity, particularly in untreated morbidity, appears to have remained severe, also seen is a relative worsening of access for poor men over this period, even though in absolute terms men are better off than poor women.

People's Health : Defining Industry Responsibility

The making of a drug policy in India has been a long and tedious odyssey through a tangled mass of opposing interests, dichotomous responsibilities, welfarist commitments and protectionist inclinations. Policy-making has been prompted nevertheless by certain notions of the role of pharmaceuticals in maintaining and enhancing the health status of people. Over the decades there has been an erosion of this focus because of intervening and often conflicting claims from industry. Periodically, committees and conventions have attempted to recover the focus.
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