ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Draft National Education PolicySubscribe to Draft National Education Policy

Examining the Linguistic Dimension of Draft National Education Policy, 2019

The Kasturirangan Committee’s framing of the draft National Education Policy, 2019 seems to be rather ill-informed linguistically. Despite its politically correct rhetoric, most of its recommendations are linguistically unsound and simply unpractical.

Towards ‘Schoolification’ of Early Childhood Years

The recommendations of the draft National Education Policy 2019 regarding early childhood care and education reduce it to school preparedness, effectively risking all the achievements made so far in this sector. If implemented as such, the comprehensive approach of the National ECCE Policy 2013, where care, nutrition, health, and early learning are seen as inseparable elements assuring the holistic development of a child will give way to a split-system where early education is prioritised at the cost of all other components, raising fears of “schoolification” of early childhood years.

Overlooking the Idea of Common School in the Education Policy

The Draft National Education Policy, 2019 lacks commitment to the idea of common school and encourages segregation and differentiation of schooling experiences for different socio-economic groups.

Vision without Basis

The Draft National Education Policy, 2019 strives to provide a vision, albeit not presenting any statistical basis or taking into account the sociopolitical and historical contexts, the regional or statewise variations and disparities, financial responsibilities, and the gains made by the earlier initiatives.

What’s in It for School Education?

The Draft National Education Policy, 2019 is silent on the role of the state in providing equality of opportunity in and through access to school education. It has fallen into the trap of measuring outcomes while remaining indifferent to input shortcomings and systemic inequalities.
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