ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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WTO and South Asia

WTO negotiations so far have shown that when countries forge alliances they can generate synergies and become powerful players. The EU, Cairns Group and the African bloc have emerged as influential groups within the WTO. Several factors have stalled the evolution of a common position among south Asian countries: regional politics and antipathies, the economic disparity in the region, and the temptation for individual countries to draw up independent arrangements with developed countries in return for trade favours often detrimental to regional interests. Will south Asian countries function with a common agenda at Cancun?

India's Negotiating Strategy for Cancun

With less than three weeks left for the Cancun ministerial meeting and negotiations having entered the critical phase this week at the William Rappard Centre that houses the WTO in Geneva, it is time to take a look at how India's negotiating positions are shaping up.

India-Pakistan: Friendship as Enmity

While one can barely deny the importance of the episode of Noor Fatima from Pakistan receiving medical treatment in Bangalore, an excavation into our mass psyche would perhaps reveal something extremely disturbing. Treating Fatima was not a usual apolitical medical practice. It is rather an unusual political gesture of benevolence arising out of a profound sense of otherness based on a clash of national identities, Indian versus Pakistani. In the otherwise spontaneous gesture to negate the otherness of her there is simultaneously an unconscious affirmation of her otherness premised on national identity.

Rethinking India's International Economic Diplomacy

Some first rough thoughts to provide a context for and to make a case for the pursuit of a clear coherent and consistent international economic policy by India's policy-makers.

India-Bangladesh Relations : Sensitive Phase

Fears of being swamped by infiltrators from Bangladesh have been aired time and again by parties across the political spectrum in the north-east. With the swearing in of Khaleda Zia as Bangladesh’s new PM at the head of a BNP-led four-party coalition, the nervousness has increased, reinforced by reports of apprehension among minorities in Bangladesh who have traditionally voted for Sheikh Hasina’s Awami League which was defeated in these elections. A number of Hindus, including Awami League workers and leaders, are believed to have crossed over to Tripura apprehending the hostility of the BNP and its allies.
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