ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

DamsSubscribe to Dams

Kerala Deluge

The role of the dams in reducing the damage during the 2018 floods in Kerala is looked at. Responding to the critiques, the authors note that the dams have produced enormous social, economic and even several ecological benefits and point out that benefits of the dams can be enhanced by improving weather forecasting capabilities.

Construction of Calamities in the Uttarakhand Himalaya

Hydropower projects on the Uttarakhand rivers have proven to aggravate the severity of floods, making them calamitous. In addition, these projects have also increased the vulnerability of the mountain villagers towards disasters, while giving these an unsettling everydayness and a spiralling effect. Projects have evaded accountability and responsibility for such disasters by opportunistically deeming these as devi aapda , or natural calamities, even as the line between natural and human-made calamities has become more blurred than ever.

Floods in Indian Rivers: Are Dams and Embankments the Solution or the Problem?

While dams and embankments are often touted as interventions for better flood management, they have often been at the root of more severe flood disasters. */

Dams Do Not Mean Development: The Case of Hydro-Electric Projects in North East India

Protests against the mega dam projects in North East India highlight the issues related to land acquisition, compensation, resettlement as well as rehabilitation for displaced and project-affected people.

Comparing Floods in Kerala and the Himalaya

There are important similarities and differences between the Kerala floods in 2018 and 2019 and the Himalayan floods of Uttarakhand and Kashmir in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Most importantly, floods in Kerala are likely to affect the local ecology in some parts of the Western Ghats, whereas floods in the Himalayan regions will affect North India as a whole. However, both the regions have a fragile ecology that is threatened by ecological destruction and industrial development. Thus, the Central Water Commission and other government agencies should take a holistic view towards addressing floods and dam management in these regions.

Dams and Development

The dialogue principally aims at opening up the question of how decisions on dams, especially large dams, can be arrived at through an open, professional and innovative exchange among the diverse stakeholders and viewpoints. The dialogue also aims to address the social and environmental debate concerning large water projects.

Dams and Development

Dam oustees in Satara district of Maharashtra recently scored a signal victory, when their 'sit-in struggle' resulted in the acceptance of their demands by the state government, including those on water allowance and equitable distribution of water. The agitators in Satara have thus managed to continue their tradition of struggle in the quest for development.

Social Impacts of Large Dams

The complexities of the imbalances between the 'losers' and the 'winners' in the distribution of the benefits of large dams are the main issues in formulating the parameters of equity principles. Gender is one layer in this complexity, and is one of the most basic aspects of a realistic impacts assessment. Gender is fundamental to equity and distribution. Due to the far-reaching transformations initiated by large dams, it is essential to ensure that the negative impacts do not outweight the positive ones. Therefore, an integration of gender is indispensable in any process that seeks to formulate equity principles.
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