ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Crimes Against WomenSubscribe to Crimes Against Women

How Real Is the Crime Decline in India?

Since 1991 in India, the crime rates of both property-related crimes and violent crimes, except crimes against women, have fallen significantly. While the decreasing trend is undisputed in Western nations, the perception in India is that the crime data has been manipulated by the police. The examination of constituent units composed of a diverse selection of districts in India suggests that the trends are generally similar across the country and are not an outcome of deliberate police practices. Police practices do not present any evidence of geographical bias in the registration of crime.

Reflections on the ‘Chalo Nagpur’ Campaign

The ‘Chalo Nagpur’ campaign mobilised thousands of women marchers and drew attention to not only the exploitation and violence suffered by women from the lower castes, classes and marginalised sections but also their efforts to build connections with women engaged in similar aims across the world.

Voices from Kamduni

The sessions court verdict in the Kamduni gang rape case has been welcomed by the villagers and activists who have been protesting both the atrocity as well as the complicity of the state government in the act.

Private Concerns in Public Discourse

This paper is based on a participatory research study that sought to explore the dynamics of community-based responses to domestic violence across five sites in India. The study was intended to provide documentation of how women-led innovative responses have emerged, how they operate, and how successful they are in addressing the needs of women subject to domestic violence. Community responses to violence can open democratic forms of dispute resolution and to operationalise an objective process through a feminist perspective, incorporating a strong element of preventive justice.

Calcutta Diary

Grandiloquence and India's ministers are usually inseparable. The deputy prime minister has proposed a new legislation which will make the death penalty mandatory for crimes against women. The defence minister has chosen to go one better. But the ministers should cut down on their hyperbole and concentrate on relatively small matters, such as the nightmare a 27-year old housewife, resident in the village of Balaghat in the district of Jabalpur in Madhya Pradesh, has been going through since last July.

On the Trail of 'Missing' Indian Females

This paper seeks to explain the century-long trend of falling proportion of females in the Indian population. In the first part, some clues to the puzzle are unearthed by identifying the age groups, regions and social groups of the estimated 21 million females gone 'missing' between 1901 and 1991. In particular, it is shown that overtime there has been a convergence of the sex ratios of adults and children, and female-male ratios declined in regions and social groups where the adult sex ratios were substantially higher than the child sex ratios. In the first half of the last century, the overall sex ratio declined because of the decline at adult ages, especially at age 40 and over. After independence, the decline has been more concentrated at ages under 15. However, census data should be interpreted with caution because improving quality of age data on children can produce a spurious trend of falling sex ratios at certain childhood ages. In the light of these disclosures, the second part of the paper reviews the plausible explanations for the long-term trend of falling female-male ratio in India.
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