ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

ConstitutionSubscribe to Constitution

The Court Fails the Citizen

The dismissal of the case on misuse of the sedition law suggests the Supreme Court is removed from reality.

Safeguarding Educational Rights of Minorities

While the minority status issue of the Aligarh Muslim University is sub judice, the Government of India should not go with the narrow and sectarian outlook that deprives minorities of their fundamental rights. Establishing an institution involves a great deal of physical, emotional and financial burden and labour on the part of the founders and the community at large. The article recalls an array of Supreme Court cases which must not be lost sight of while interpreting the minorities' rights to "establish and administer educational institutions."

Uniform Civil Code: A Heedless Quest?

The necessity or otherwise of a uniform civil code cannot be debated in the absence of a coherent conception of what the UCC will be and what it will do. Although it has urged the government to enact one, the Supreme Court's own judgments reveal the hollowness in its understanding of the UCC. Perhaps, uniformity itself is no answer to the myriad problems of religion-based personal laws.

Menstruation, Purity and Right to Worship

The growing protest against temples that deny access to menstruating women should also challenge the institutionalisation of faith and the mediating power of the priest.

Making Good Citizens : Teaching Fundamental Duties in Schools

A committee headed by Justice J S Verma constituted to examine the teaching of fundamental duties in institutions of learning submitted a comprehensive report in 1999. This essay examines the recommendations in the broad context of the ongoing debate on social science curriculum in schools, focusing on the manner in which some of the contested issues within citizenship theory have been explored.

Calcutta Diary

An honourable judge of the Supreme Court has recently observed that the Constitution is more important than a popular mandate. That is all very well, but is the Constitution more important than the mandate of the World Trade Organisation? This is a tough nut to crack, and one the authorities are most reluctant to crack on their own.

The Constitution as Instrument of Social Change

Our Constitution, Government and Politics by M V Pylee; Universal Law Publishing Company, Delhi, 2000; pp ix + 198, Rs 185.

Pages

Back to Top