ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Communal violenceSubscribe to Communal violence

Speech as Action

Even those speeches that don’t intend to cause harm can lead to violence with the usage of “thick terms.”

Underscoring Political-Criminal Nexus

The incident of communal violence in Agarpur, Vaishali, Bihar in November 2015, clearly points to the widespread nexus among hoodlums, politicians with criminal records, and the police in the state. Dismantling this criminal patronage network, which perpetuates communalism and casteism and exacerbates lawlessness, is one of the biggest challenges that confronts the Nitish Kumar regime.

Rehabilitating Riot Victims

Communal Violence, Forced Migration and the State: Gujarat since 2002 by Sanjeevini Badigar Lokhande; New Delhi: Cambridge University Press, 2015;pp xii + 215, price not indicated.

Bal Thackeray

Bal Thackeray, the son of an anti-caste reformist, came from a background rich in learning and culture. Yet, he chose to use his learning and wit to destroy rather than create. Under his direction, the Sena resorted to intimidation and terror, first against south Indians, then communists and Muslims.

Gujarat Riots in the Light of the History of Communal Violence

The frequency with which communal holocausts have been taking place in India shows that there is something fundamentally wrong with our political system as well as our secular governance. The carnage in Gujarat did not occur suddenly and simply in reaction to what happened in Godhra. The Sangh parivar politically thrived only through hate politics, opposing everything that went in favour of minorities. Over the years it has created a mindset among the Hindus, who question not only the loyalty of minorities towards India but also consider them fundamentalist and fanatical, and the Hindus as liberal and secular.

Understanding Communal Violence

Understanding Communal Violence Ethnic Conflict and Civic Life: Hindus and Muslims in India by Ashutosh Varshney; Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2002; pp ix+382, 35 pounds (Indian edition: Oxford University Press, 2002, pp ix+382, Rs 495).

Transgressing Boundaries of Gender and Identity

Just as the stories of black women in the US, caught up in the whirlwind of lynchings and gendered genealogy of racist violence have been hidden from history, will also the narratives of women, caught in the midst of communal violence get erased? To avoid this eventuality feminism would have to be recast within the complex intersectionality of gender and identity.

The Second Gujarat Catastrophe

The second act of the catastrophe in Gujarat was carried out within parliamentary portals, in the course of the debate on the Gujarat violence which exposed the hypocrisy that while political discourse might concern itself with people's anguish, it is in reality driven by aspects of competitive politics. Even as extraordinary violence was perpetrated on Indian women, it was women's bodies that provided the necessary domain for the assertion of competitive party politics - a fact reflected in the arguments and counter-arguments offered during the debate. As this essay suggests, the ominous final message that seeps through is that constitutional governance can achieve little except normalise violence, almost as a social cost of democratic politics, in which even structured practices of governance are established that deny as well silence women's sufferings. The task for the 'active citizen' thus is to frame imaginative patterns of social action that would not merely empower victims but also adequately present the voices of suffering, giving voice to the anguish - a task that could effectively challenge the newly instituted narratives of 'pride' and 'honour'.

Surviving Gujarat 2002

Thousands of people have been coming to Gujarat in the last few months motivated by the need to 'do something' - to mourn, to document and to do whatever they can to redress the injustice perpetrated on one community in the name of another. It is this documentation at all levels that has brought home the composite horror of Gujarat 2002.

Whither Gujarat?

Large-scale looting, arson and even mass burning are not new for Gujarat. But last fortnight, the violence took unbelievably brutal forms. The collapse of the state was evident - even the symbols of the institutions of the state were under attack . What kind of forces have generated this ugly metamorphosis in Gandhi's Gujarat? Perhaps more than anything else it is the changing self-perceptions of the modernising and rapidly growing middle classes, their search for a new identity and structures of domination and the lack of a significant radical challenge from below.

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