ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Gandhi and the Development of Public Health Infrastructure in Interwar Bombay

The fight for independence from the colonial yoke gained momentum in the early 20th century. Anti-colonial sentiment reached its peak in the interwar period as a result of the mass movements initiated by Gandhi, and his ideas of “non-violence,” ‘boycott’ and ‘swadeshi’ had a significant impact on the minds of the native population. This essay examines the impact of Gandhian ideology on the development of public health infrastructure in Bombay city during the interwar period. It highlights the contribution of the medical professionals and students in Bombay, challenging the colonial authorities and constructing a national identity through the lens of public health infrastructure.

Citizenship as Participation

The peaceful indefinite sit-in by Muslim women at Shaheen Bagh has become the epicentre of nationwide protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act–National Population Register–National Register of Citizens, as the protestors have brought to the fore a protest performative that is to be comprehended beyond the physical protest site. As a people’s protest in the true sense, it contests the state’s excessive urge to define and dominate, and flags pressing concerns vis-à-vis discrimination in the face of a consumerism-driven argument of inconvenience. In doing so, the protestors help us understand resistance as an expression of belonging and citizenship as a participatory tool, rather than a status granted by the state on the basis of select documents.

 

Protests, Lies and Realpolitik

It is not easy to understand just how uneasy many Americans are about the Bush's dubious venture. There has been widespread reaction across the country in major cities and towns and university campuses. Many have rallied around the flag resignedly, though the spirit is anything but jingoistic. While echoes of an earlier epoch suffuse the new actions, the perennial debate on whether civil disobedience does more harm than good has been reopened.

Hannah Arendt and the Problem of Our Age

The moment we stop asking questions or are killed for asking them a new kind of history writing takes place. And it is here that the works of three Jewish thinkers, Hannah Arendt, Martin Buber and Simone Weil, become significant. The connecting thread between them is their struggle for freedom in circumstances which were devoid of human reason. They dealt with violence and injustice in ways which were deeply rational and humane.

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