ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Child Sex RatioSubscribe to Child Sex Ratio

Missing Girls

Sex ratios in India have been declining for decades, and “missing girls” are a serious social and political problem. Drawing on subdistrict-level data from the 2001 and 2011 Censuses and detailed data on women’s education and fertility, we show that more-educated mothers have fewer girl children than less-educated mothers, but that these girls are also more likely to survive. The policy implication of these findings is that among uneducated mothers, the focus should be on child treatment and survival; among educated mothers, attitudinal campaigns that emphasise the value of having girl children are likely to be more successful.

Nutritional Well-Being and Gender Differences

How much difference does economic growth make to the nutritional well-being of young children? What effect does it have on traditional child care practices, and specifically on the tendency to favour male children? A follow-up 30 years after a classic study carried out in 1971 in Punjab villages indicates changes that are dramatic, but also that rapid economic growth, while necessary, may not have been sufficient.

Fighting Female Foeticide

The recent census data reveal some apparently contradictory phenomena. For instance, in 1991, the overall sex ratio declined and so also the child sex ratio, while in 2001, the overall sex ratio increased but the child sex ratio declined. How is this to be explained?

Census of India 2001 and After

It goes to the credit of the 2001 Census Commissioner that he could at once see a shocking aspect of this Census, namely, a sharp decline in the female-male ratio in several states. Migration cannot explain this phenomenon which must be the consequence of female foeticide on a massive scale, if not female infanticide and higher female child mortality rates. It is unfortunate that even in the progressive south Indian states, except Kerala, the child sex ratio has declined.
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