ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Private Sector Participation in Solid Waste Management and Regulatory Strategy

In most developing countries, waste is managed by government bodies who allocate a large amount of resources but rarely obtain the desired results. Taking this problem into account, this article explores the relationship between environmental policy and firms engaged in solid waste management by studying the case of four firms in the SWM industry in India. Five factors could have an impact on SWM firms in India—demand for waste, awareness among waste generators, segregation as a habit, encouraging decentralisation, and state support. Appropriate policy measures to create awareness about the demand for waste can become a powerful addition to the existing tools since market forces can drive the waste management activity more effectively.

Riverfront Development of Mula–Mutha

Like the majority of rivers in India, Mula and Mutha rivers of Pune, Maharashtra, have been condensed to severely polluted, vulnerable waterbodies. These rivers are burdened further as they are set to host a riverfront along the lines of the Sabarmati riverfront project, which itself has attracted severe criticism.

Weather Conditions and Air Pollution

To understand the impact of the odd-even policy in Delhi researchers will need to take into account prevailing weather conditions of not just Delhi, but also its outskirts and neighbouring states.

The Season of Unreason

The abandonment of reason appears to be part of the nation's drive towards 'modernisation'. All dissent is dismissed as 'anti-national' or 'pseudo-secular'. Democracy is not to be governed any more by the scientific temper that provides work for the idle and food for the hungry but by the technology that puts missiles into orbit and resources into export.
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