ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Professionalising Election Campaigns

The 2014 and 2019 general elections in India were referred to as “WhatsApp elections,” which had IT cells, bots, and political consultants strategically using data mining tools to build resonant narratives to tell voters what they wanted to hear. By the 2014 national election, the industry was reported to be worth $40–$47 million. Between 2014 and 2018, industry specialists approximated that the number of firms in this market had at least doubled. These unprecedented tools of technological campaigning come with new forms of identifying, targeting, and defining issues of political importance. This article suggests that such developments are turning electoral politics into a thriving business being data-driven, technologically oriented, and having far-reaching implications for democratic processes.

Posthumanist Confinement

The idea of tech companies as an important power in the creation of what Gilles Deleuze called “societies of control” is explored, building on which contemporary posthumanism is looked at as human existence represented and replicated as non-human entities. The practice of “digital eugenics” by tech...

Cambridge Analytica and the Political Economy of Persuasion

Where do the financial interests of social media platforms and advertising firms align with the interests of political actors? Where might these interests conflict with constitutional values? What technologies aid such interests and why might these justify being thought of differently from similar conflicts offline? Part of this debate tends to overstate the impact of technological architecture on public opinion. As we approach the 2019 general elections in India, a framework to regulate political advertising and data privacy has become most urgent.

Cambridge Analytica and the Political Economy of Persuasion

Where do the financial interests of social media platforms and advertising firms align with the interests of political actors? Where might these interests conflict with constitutional values? As we approach the 2019 general elections in India, a framework to regulate political advertising and data privacy has become most urgent.
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