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Thinking Clearly about Suicide in India—III

The rapid rise in suicide rates above 15 per lakh persons for teenaged males generated great public concern in Australia in the 1980s. Considered a “crisis” level, this led to an intense study of the causes of youth suicide as well as intensive efforts to devise public health programmes to assist young people at the risk of suicide. Reaching a peak in 1991, teenage male suicide rates have fallen steadily and are now less than 10 per lakh. In India, youth suicide rates vary greatly between states for males and females. For young males, suicide rates in 28, and for females in 12 states and union territories were at or above the crisis level. Yet there has been virtually no public recognition of the level or seriousness of youth suicide.

Indo-Japan Memorandum on Civil Nuclear Cooperation

India and Japan have reportedly reached a preliminary understanding to sign a civil nuclear cooperation agreement after certain technical details are finalised. However domestic politics of Japan, anti-nuclear groups and India’s reluctance to join the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty are some of the concerns that would have to be addressed before the deal is finalised.

Promise of Citizens' Media

Community radio - the cheapest and most accessible of the electronic mass media - is ruled out in many countries because of legal restrictions. This paper looks at community radio in Australia and South Africa. Australia has a mature 'third tier' of broadcasting, now over 20 years old, facing the problems of an established sector, with consistent if relatively diminishing state support. As a relatively new democracy, South Africa's adoption of community radio is significant on a global scale. As the debate around community radio in India gathers momentum, and various initiatives start to emerge, some of the challenges they currently face may have lessons for India.

Australia in India

If the 1990s marked an intensification of the process of `globalisation', within the policy discourse of the higher education sector that process has manifested itself through the idea of the `international university'. In part, internationalisation implies a redefinition of higher education as a globally marketed commodity or as an export oriented `industry'. These developments are examined by means of an analysis of the internationalisation of Australian education, and the operational procedures, strategies, and expansionist market objectives of Australian higher education institutions in India. It is argued that, under the hegemony of neo-liberal ideology, these international linkages are emerging as a result of the transformation and restructuring of the higher education sector in both nations.

Australia's Backward March?

Australia's conservative establishment appears to want to keep their country in a time warp: after all why change when past policies - of immigration and the issue of aboriginals - have served the country so well? Besides, it is important for Australia to project itself as a harmonious and homogeneous nation so that security and other ties with the US may be nurtured.

Australia : Hundred Years of Federation

On the three important issues - the republic, Asia and the Aborigines, all considered important for Australia's contemporary national identity - there has been only halting movement. This is hardly the stuff of festive celebrations of a century of federation.
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