ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Reservations: ​A Project of Nation-building

The history of reservations in India shows that it was an outcome of a long process of struggle to gain recognition and representation for the minorities, especially Dalits. It also shows that the Dalits as an important third force in politics, apart from the Hindus and Muslims, had to compromise and even sacrifice their legitimate demands in this process. Any tinkering with reservations, therefore, is in bad faith and an assault to the Indian nationhood.

Conjoint Effects of Caste

This article attempts to extend studies on Ambedkar’s understanding of the nation state to include his concerns for the international. This is achieved by looking at the problem of caste inequality outside the borders of the Indian nation state and the latter’s response or the absence of response to such a pertinent issue. Via an analysis of political sovereignty, the social question, and Buddhism, we seek to demonstrate how Ambedkar reworks the connections between the national and the international on the common register of human equality.

Dalit Feminist Thought

Dalit women’s experiences as epistemic spaces form the basis for a new conceptual and theoretical framework of a Dalit “womanist–humanist complex” to analyse the materiality of caste, class, gender, sexuality, local economy, and power relationships, both within and outside of the Dalit community. How do Dalits navigate awkward contingencies, tenuous histories, socio-economic contexts, political pressures, and cultural realities to negotiate with the regimes of power, carve their agency, and contribute to feminist thought, praxis, pedagogies, and politics? The myriad ways through which Dalits have consistently expanded, challenged, and revolutionised feminism, by working on different potentials, hopes, and futures, are demonstrated here.

Ambedkar in 2021, Episode 3: Probing Caste Violence at the Visible, Symbolic, and Structural Levels

In this episode, we speak to Parthasarathi Muthukkaruppan about the everyday aspects of caste violence and cultural modes of opposing subordination.

Translating Public Protests into the Digital Realm

Notes from an Ambedkarite cultural troupe about taking the protest site online.

Ambedkar, Gandhians and the Indian Village

The paper attempts to understand the two competing models of postcolonial modernity on the issue of the village, that is, one representing a Gandhian perspective and the other a liberal Western perspective led by B R Ambedkar. M K Gandhi’s idea of the village was developed through his imagination...

Early India, Goats and Brahmins

Early Indians: The Story of Our Ancestors and Where We Came From by Tony Joseph, New Delhi: Juggernaut, 2018; pp 288, ₹ 699 (hardcover).

The Making of Ambedkarite Public Culture

Public culture is a mental and physical space where basic ideas of the self and world view get crystallised. It is the main space to form varied communicative lines. These communicative lines discipline person’s behaviour. Since the Dalit’s ideas about self and consciousness were largely shaped by their everyday experience, Ambedkar thoughtfully evolved the Dalit’s public culture towards conscientising mental and physical space. A number of nodal points in varied communicative lines were generated to cultivate the autonomous Dalit assertive self and emancipatory world view. It produced an atmosphere where social discursive engagements were developed along with Ambedkarite praxis. As Mumbai happens to be the place where Ambedkar conceived, started and developed the key emancipatory movements, the city turned out to be a precursor for the “Ambedkarite public culture.”

Reading Ambedkar in the Time of Covid-19

What lies behind the policy blindness towards concerns of the oppressed in India? The “social distancing” induced by the COVID-19 health crisis does not address the problem of deeper levels of distancing caused by “social isolation” and “social nausea,” two concepts used by B R Ambedkar. This article is an attempt to understand the factors behind the collective sociopolitical response towards the poorest sections characterised by lack of empathy, and to develop an Ambedkarite framework to understand social policy generally and, more specifically, in India.

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