ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Cross-Border Terrorism

The cross-border terrorism sponsored by Pakistan has to be situated in the broader context of the burgeoning terrorism that has plagued contemporary Pakistan. The links between top army personnel, bureaucrats and political leaders, on the one hand, and terrorists and drug barons, on the other, have acquired a measure of legitimacy under the banner of Islam and jihad. The transnational links of terrorist outfits also necessitate international coalitions to weed out terrorism. Nevertheless the India-Pakistan peace initiatives that are currently under way represent a positive development because they can make an incremental contribution to ending cross-border terrorism.

Unheard Melodies from Afghanistan

An extremely well-researched report prepared by an expert on Afghan music and brought out by the Copenhagen-based Freemuse not only sheds light on the state of music and musicians of Afghanistan at a critical juncture of history, but also provokes wider questions about the basic relationship between artistes and religious and political bigots.

Reconstruction of Afghanistan into a Modern Nation

Afghanistan today presents a unique case of reconstruction; its significance for world peace is enormous. This note maps the vital issues in the economy, polity, and society of Afghanistan. The Bonn agreement seems to have certain internal contradictions; an attempt has been made here to resolve them.

Afghanistan: A Failed State?

The picture of Afghanistan as a part of a complex multi-levelled regional conflict system is much closer to the mark than the idea of a failed state. This has implications for the emerging arguments for a post-conflict multi-ethnic form of political representation.

Only Alternative to Global Terror

The ongoing strikes on Afghanistan have once again focused attention on the dual strands of terrorism that bases itself on communalism and imperialism. Both strands seek to repress various freedoms and in cases, even justify the human rights violations on the part of their perpetrators. The need then is to uphold virtues of secularism, for only a truly secular state can safeguard human and democratic rights for all concerned. Further, institutions and machinery to deal with violations of fundamental rights become equally vital in situations where governments persistently fail to do so.

Afghanistan, Islam and the Left

In the debate on the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and its violent manifestations, the space has been dominated by those who take a strictly religious position and those who are apologists of the realpolitik of the US-led western alliance. A Leftist perspective has been missing in the whole discourse.

Afghanistan and the Vietnam Syndrome

Despite public support to root out the al Qaida network and depose the Taliban, the Bush administration will be mistaken if it believes that the Vietnam syndrome - a public aversion to unnecessary foreign adventures - is obsolete. The degree of domestic dissent will depend on how carefully the US conducts its Afghan operations.

Afghan Watershed for Central Asia

The reactions of the Central Asian states to the United States' 'war against terrorism' will be guided by the fact that while the American presence in the region is likely to be temporary, Afghanistan will always be there on the other side of the border.

New 'New War' and an Old Problem

Islamisation in modern times is not simply a throwback to the past. It evolved in the schools in Deoband as a form of Islamic revival to form trans-regional identities under colonialism. And jihad may seem like a reasonable option in establishing these identities.

India and the War against Terrorism

India's foreign minister has described the war against terrorism as between a coalition of democracies and terrorism. But that does not isolate terrorism. There are many countries which are not democratic or are semi-democratic whose support needs to be enlisted. India's main enemy today is not Pakistan, or Afghanistan, but terrorism. It should contribute in building the broadest possible anti-terrorist coalition.

War as Failure of Imagination

The war against terrorism threatens to make reason its first casualty and demands for justice are in danger of being reduced to thirst for revenge.

Afghan Armageddon?

Short of the Taliban graciously handing over Osama bin Laden and his rabble no imaginable act of appeasement can stay the hand of the US military. But pure retaliation will not suffice. Ample ploughshares must accompany the shiny high tech swords if the hatreds that steered the fatal airliners are to be stemmed rather than stoked.

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