ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Educational Deprivation of the Tribes

The paper examines the nature of tribal deprivation, with specific focus on the issue of education. The research delves into the supply– and the demand–side factors, which determined the state of education within a region. Reaffirming the deprivation faced by the tribal communities, the study identifies specific factors that cause marginalisation. It points to the failure of the uniform tribal development programme to deal with the context–specific problems and thereby achieving the targeted results. The paper suggests the importance of not assuming the homogeneity of tribal societies, and need for public policies that are sensitive to this fact, in order to translate the goal of empowerment into a reality.

Does Access to Educational Institutions Signify Gaining Quality Education?

The Annual Status of Education Report has been instrumental in understanding the education trends in rural India. The ASER 2022, published after a gap of four years, draws attention to the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic on the primary and middle school education. While an increase in the enrolment rate is an encouraging observation, declining foundational learning abilities is a grim development. Drawing inferences from the major findings of the report, this article suggests the need for renewed collective efforts from the state, teachers, parents, and neighbourhood community to meet the new educational challenges.

 

Overlapping Marginalities

The experience of the COVID-19 pandemic shows that excessive reliance on digital technologies for delivery of education can sharpen the inequalities in learning. In Bhiwandi, both a metropolitan and a digital periphery in Maharashtra, such unequal learning opportunities further marginalised the citizens of the locality. Female students additionally faced several challenges. Among the many freedoms upended during the pandemic was the spatial mobility, offered by the physical access to the colleges. Where educational institutions failed to effectively adapt to the situation, undergraduate Muslim women experienced a lack of digital access and poor quality of learning.

Why ‘Online’ Is Not the Way Forward in Education: A Reading List

Online education is inimical to inclusivity and access. While bridging the digital divide is imperative, a move towards online education is likely to dismantle the transformational potential of university spaces, and usher in a commodification of learning.

Broadband Internet Access

With the effects of the pandemic becoming increasingly severe by the day, there has been an almost total shift to online modes of operation. However, this has created a huge digital divide in the country, aggravating the already existing inequalities. To realise the dream of a digitally inclusive India, internet has to be provided as a public good and at subsidised rates for low-income households.

Women and Girls’ Access to and Experience of Education: A Reading List

Girls and women’s access to and experience of education is obstructed by male-preferencing power structures that guide perceptions about domestic labour, marriage, and safety.
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