ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Why India Did Not Go to War with China

India had the military ability to evict the intrusions in Ladakh or carry out a quick grab action of its own in the early stages of the crisis. Yet, it did not exercise the offensive military options. The explanation for such strategic reticence lies at the political level.

The US–China Disruption and the World Order

As foreign offices around the world try to make sense of the disruption in United States–China relations, it is useful to step back and see where things might be headed. The uncertainty revolves around some fundmental questions: Will the two erstwhile allies during the first Cold War wage a similar struggle against one another? What will be the normative basis of their rivalry? Is it about power or incongruent visions of the world order?

Covid-19 and US–China Tussle

In the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, the Sino–American relations have hit a new low. Both the countries are engaged in a propaganda war against each other, which the United States seems to be winning. The US suffers from Sinophobia and has cultivated hate against Asian Americans, which is reminiscent of the anti-China sentiment that was prevalent in American cities in the late 19th century. The pandemic experience is likely to make the US more insular and reluctant to embrace foreigners

COVID-19 Should Make Us Re-imagine the World Order

As a bio-security crisis brings the world to a brink, the dominant neo-liberal vision of world order must be displaced by a humane globalism and institutions that actually supply public goods.

Modi’s Multi-alignment and Nehru’s Non-alignment

There is very little to distinguish between the foreign policy of Jawaharlal Nehru and Narendra Modi. Both are equally aligned with America to serve its hegemonic interests. Nehru’snon-alignment and Modi’s multi-alignment is not averse to playing ball with the American hard as well as soft power. Both policies see America as a natural partner of India.

Approaching Kashmir through Theoretical Lenses

The National Democratic Alliance government’s Kashmir policy can be analysed through the lenses of security studies and peace studies. Insights from these disciplinary fields could help gauge the implications of recent actions and suggest a possible different course.

Perils of Relying on American Support

The contemporary wars in the Indian subcontinent have seen an increasing involvement, or at least, mediation, by the United States. The subcontinental elite have relied far too much on the US to bring them victory in war. India learnt the lesson in 1962 when the US failed to provide India the much needed bomber support to win the war. For Pakistan, the moment arrived in 1971, when despite overt US support, it failed to preserve East Pakistan. Once again India seems to be relying on American support to achieve its objectives in Kashmir, imagining that personal relations with American leadership is enough to win wars.

India’s Civilisational Identity and the World Order

As the neo-liberal world order declines, non-Western powers are uniquely equipped to manage the power transition and contestations over the basic tenets of the emerging system. India’s civilisational ethos of reconciling different ideas will be of immense value in navigating the uncertainty and turmoil at a critical juncture of world history.

Military Professionalism and Effectiveness

The military’s input to national security may be swayed by ideological winds if it loses its apolitical grounding. The government and military must thus maintain the status quo on civil–military relations.

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