ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

State Elections 2007-08Subscribe to State Elections 2007-08

Delhi Assembly Elections: 2008

Pulling off its third successive win in the Delhi assembly election, the Congress demonstrated that public dissatisfaction with its Sheila Dikshit-led government was not as overwhelming as supposed. The Bharatiya Janata Party did gain three more seats and more of the popular votes but it did not have enough in its armoury to upset the ruling party. The main gainer in the election was the Bahujan Samaj Party, which won two seats and attracted a large chunk of the traditional support base of the Congress and the BJP.

Madhya Pradesh: Overriding the Contours of Anti-Incumbency

A high level of voter satisfaction with the government and disarray in the ranks of the opposition saw the Bharatiya Janata Party retaining power in Madhya Pradesh. Though the Congress managed to put on a better show than in 2003, its internal problems did not allow it to pose much of a threat to the BJP. And, with the exception of the Bahujan Samaj Party, none of the smaller parties could cash in on the antiincumbency factor.

Karnataka: The Lotus Blooms...Nearly

The Bharatiya Janata Party pulled off an impressive win in Karnataka in the May 2008 election though in the initial outcome it was two short of a majority in the assembly. The party was helped to its first triumph in south India by nonstop squabbling in the Congress among its many leaders and an erosion in the support base of the Janata Dal (Secular).

Rajasthan: Dissatisfaction and a Poor Campaign Defeat BJP

The popular mood in Rajasthan seemed to be that the Vasundhara Raje government deserved a second chance, but dissatisfaction with it on specific issues and a poorly-run campaign saw the Congress squeak ahead. The Congress success came from regaining supremacy in the adivasi belt and a polarisation of women voters in its favour.

Understanding the Paradoxical Outcome in Jammu and Kashmir

In spite of boycott calls following the Amarnath agitation of mid-2008, the Jammu and Kashmir assembly election saw a large voter turnout. This article examines whether this turnout can be said to indicate a substantial reduction in political alienation and a decline in sympathy for separatist politics in the Valley. It also analyses whether the National Conference- Congress government reflects the true will of the people because it keeps out the two parties that gained the most in the election, the People's Democratic Party and the Bharatiya Janata Party.

Chhattisgarh 2008: Defeating Anti-Incumbency

The Bharatiya Janata Party's triumph in the Chhattisgarh assembly election had a lot to do with the way in which the public perceived the gains of the Raman Singh government's social sector spending. The opposition Congress embarked on its campaign with the plank of antiincumbency but forgot to factor in that there is a perceptible link between voter choice and satisfaction with performance.

Himachal Pradesh Elections 2007: A Post-Poll Analysis

The Bharatiya Janata Party stormed to success in the 2007 election against a squabbleridden Congress, which failed to take advantage of the popular sentiment there in favour of its programmes. The election result showed that the political ground was shifting in the state with a more mature electorate looking beyond the old formulas of region, caste and religion.
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