ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Status Paper on Database Issues of the Services Sector

The sustained and rapid growth of the services sector in the Indian economy has raised questions about how to accurately estimate the contribution of the sector to GDP. There are problems relating to the methodology employed on the contribution of the private sector, especially the unorganised part of the private sector. This paper outlines these problems, which were considered at the March 2006 seminar.

Gross Domestic Product from Services Sector

This paper deals with the methodology and data sources used for estimating gross value added from different categories of services, especially from the unorganised sector. The GVA estimates are first obtained for the benchmark year as a product of workforce estimate with the GVA per worker. These are moved forward to get the corresponding values for subsequent years by making use of physical and price indicators. In this paper we discuss the problems in getting the estimates of workforce for the base year. In most cases consumer price indices are used to estimate GVA per worker at current prices. It also discusses the problems relating to the use of physical indicators. Some suggestions for improving the estimates are given.

Regrouping of Economic Activities

The authors describe the manner in which the Central Statistical Organisation regrouped economic activities according to a new classification scheme which could be used to compile national accounts statistics with the new base year 1999-2000. This classification scheme was particularly important for the service sector of the economy. The justifiability of the classification scheme is discussed with reference to the relative standard error in estimating gross value added for each group of activities, at all-India and state levels, and for rural and urban areas.

The Nepali Revolution and International Relations

Following the June 1, 2001 murder of king Birendra and the royal family, the US intervened militarily in Nepal. At first India closely coordinated with the US strategy for the military defeat of the Maoist-led People's War in Nepal, and China acquiesced. But starting in the spring of 2004 both India and China came to reject the US anathema of the Nepali Maoists as "terrorists" and accept them as legitimate actors on the international stage. With the "12-point agreement" in November 2005, the success of the April 2006 urban insurrection, the comprehensive peace agreement in the fall of 2006, and the Maoists entering the government in early April 2007, US intervention in Nepal has, for the time, been thwarted.

Legitimacy Crisis of Nepali Monarchy

The Nepali monarchy has always used Hinduism and the army to exercise control. Now, with all political parties coming together to remove the army from control by the palace, the monarchy's future seems in doubt.

People's War in Nepal: Genesis and Development

The overthrow of the autocratic party-less panchayat system in Nepal in 1990 was an advance, but what followed was a completely degenerate form of parliamentary politics. In the background of these developments, the political path of a protracted armed struggle as the route to a "new democratic revolution" took shape and was launched by the Maoists in February 1996. This article traces the genesis and development of the "People's War" in Nepal, focusing on elements of continuity in the salient features of the strategy of the PW.

Caste, Ethnicity and Inequality in Nepal

Nepal faces the danger of an all-out ethnic war breaking out in the Tarai between madhesis and parbatiyas. But, in most of the country there are so many complex and crosscutting ethnic allegiances which make a Sri Lankan-type polarisation unlikely. In the eastern Tarai, however, with its 30 per cent population of parbatiyas, there is a very real possibility that "two majorities with minority complexes" could confront each other in bloody vendettas.

Reactivating the Past

Nondescript memorial stones and small shrines in several regions of Uttar Pradesh commemorate those dalit heroes who played a significant role in the events of 1857. For dalits in the region, these shrines are sacrosanct structures where their heroes are worshipped, while stories and legends relating to them are used to fashion a new history for the marginalised, one that glorifies the role dalit rebels played in 1857.

The Mutiny Novel

The Indian Mutiny of 1857 marked a shift in governance from the Mughal emperor to the East India Company. The literature of this period indicates a movement away from India as an adventure space to India as a domestic space. This essay examines two novels, to show the dissolution of a romantic and picturesque India; instead it is a land that is feminised, determined and bound to its colonial masters.

1857 and Ideas about Nationhood in Bengal

The events of 1857 have been represented in divergent ways. Most popular of such interpretations have been those that link 1857 with the emergence of nationalism in the country. This article draws on accounts, actual and fictional, written by the Bengali literati to explain the various discourses shaped by 1857. In the Bengali nationalist imagination an understanding of 1857 was derived via the conceptual category of the "samaj".

Historians and Historiography

The many interpretations of the events of 1857 since the 150 years of its occurrence need to be seen in their historiographical context. This explains the narrow religious focus that contemporary observers bestowed on it as well as the nationalist aspirations that were seen to characterise 1857, as historians in the years immediately following independence in 1947 sought to establish. The important presence of 1857 in the creation of an Indian history and identity explains the many "myths" traced to it by various communities and groups, as well as the abiding interest of historians in the various facets of that special event. These are all aspects of 1857 that this special issue seeks to explore.

Music and Society in North India: From the Mughals to the Mutiny

The period from early 18th century leading up to the Mutiny of 1857 witnessed massive political and socio-cultural turmoil which impacted the evolution of musical culture as well. This paper synthesises existing historical work on the complex evolution of musical culture in northern India during the period, focusing on the origins and development of those forms that became identified as mainstream classical Hindustani music in the 20th century.

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