ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Index of Industrial Production

Small business organisations need short-run estimation and forecasting, and a model that has limited data requirements. Statistical techniques currently used are linear in approach, depend on the choice of the data set’s start–end period, and have low statistical reliability. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition approach is not constrained by these limitations or by the non-stationarity and non-linearity attributes of data. As an illustration, the Indian Index of Industrial Production time series is used to develop a coincident indicator of movements in the index that is simple to model, uses real-time data, and makes accurate forecasts.

Patterns of Marriage Dissolution in India

Data from the Census and District Level Household Survey-3 (2007–08) are used in this paper. The factors of marriage dissolution in India and its regions are investigated using multivariate hazard analysis. The results show that dissolution rates are higher in North-east, South, and West India than in other regions. The risk of marriage dissolution is twice as high for women in urban areas than rural, and higher among the poor than the non-poor, and among the childless than among women with at least one child.

Urban Transport Planning in Bengaluru

Transport planning in Bengaluru is characterised by institutional fragmentation, increasing private modes of transport, and questionable investment decisions in the transport sector. What are the possibilities of implementing a polycentric governance system in such a city? Answering this question requires exploring the characteristics of polycentric governance systems as part of the larger discourse in institutional economics and reflecting upon how far Bengaluru satisfies such characteristics and where changes may be required.

Religious Identity at the Crossroads

​ The religious identity of the Hindu fisherfolk of Kerala—the Dheevaras—has been a site of multiple and contradictory interpretations by agents and institutions with varied interests. While their caste association—the Akhila Kerala Dheevara Sabha—is urging them towards Sanskritisation and allegiance to Hindutva, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh is engaging them in their communal propaganda. At stake is a host of religious practices and philosophies evolved by the Dheevaras through their occupation of fishing, and the contribution of early Dheevara reformers in critiquing the Brahminic domination of Hinduism and the caste system.

Changing India’s Urban and Economic Landscape

India’s urban landscape needs new city forms, alternative economic arrangements, and universal social welfare to survive in the coming era. Instead, urbanisation policies are driving the dysfunctional 19th-century colonial metro cities towards absorbing enormous migrations that will make India a fragile state. Three initiatives are proposed as an alternative to macroeconomic policies that no longer prioritise human development. This position has been largely ignored due to the conflicts between theories and ideologies of economic and cultural development.

Legal Status and Deprivation in Urban Slums over Two Decades

In India, 59% of urban slums are “non-notified” and lack legal recognition by the government. Data on 2,901 slums from four rounds of the National Sample Survey spanning nearly 20 years is used to assess the relationship between a slum’s legal status and the severity of deprivation in access to basic services, including piped water, latrines, and electricity. There is a progressive reduction in deprivation the longer a slum has been notified. These findings suggest that legally recognising non-notified slums, and targeting government aid to these settlements, may be crucial for improving health outcomes and reducing urban disparities.

Discrepancies between Flow of Funds Accounts and National Accounts Statistics

The Reserve Bank of India revamped the flow of funds compilations to be in conformity with the sectoral classification recommended in the System of National Accounts 2008, which has also been adopted in the revised series of National Accounts Statistics, brought out by the Central Statistics Office. Though the revisions made in the compilations of the two organisations are expected to bring about refinements, wide discrepancies have been noticed between the financial resources gap emanating from the flow of funds accounts and the investment–saving gap derivable from the National Accounts Statistics. The revisions inducted into the respective accounts emphasise the need to reduce the discrepancies between the two sets of accounts to an acceptable level.

Road Traffic Accidents and Injuries in India

Road traffic fatalities constitute 16.6% of all deaths, making this the sixth leading cause of death in India, and a major contributor to socio-economic losses, the disability burden, and hospitalisation. An attempt to measure catastrophic levels of health expenditure on accidental injuries, road traffic accidents, and falls, finds that the burden of out-of-pocket expenditure is the highest for such injuries. The financial burden is particularly high for poorer households in rural areas, and those seeking treatment at private health facilities with no health insurance. Public health facilities for trauma care and health coverage for low-income groups could help these vulnerable households.

Corporate Social Responsibility Rules in India

The corporate social responsibility rules, which came into force from April 2014, make it mandatory for large Indian firms to set aside at least 2% of their average net profit for socially responsible expenditures. This paper aims to provide an assessment of the response by firms to these rules. It examines the extent to which these rules have led firms to comply and the extent to which their implementation over the financial year 2014–15 has contributed additional funds towards the social development of the country. The analysis is based on firm-level data sets of Indian firms for 2010–15. We find that following the implementation of these rules there has been an increase in the number of firms that are spending on CSR initiatives as well as the total amount spent on CSR activities. However, the distribution of CSR expenditures amongst firms is extremely unequal.

Public Expenditure, Governance and Human Development

Madhya Pradesh is a state that is "off-track" in achievement of most of the Millennium Development Goals, with wide variance on development outcomes between districts. This study examines the link between public expenditure, quality of governance and human development outcomes in the state, and finds that development expenditure by itself is insufficient in achieving human development at the district level. Public expenditure has better outcomes in districts with better governance indicators, indicating the need to focus on improving governance mechanisms as well as increasing development expenditure.

Contextualising Educational Decentralisation Policies in India

The impact of the local contextualisation of successive rounds of educational decentralisation reform on organisational learning and capacities of rural educational governance structures is examined. From locating schools in local self-government in the mid-1990s, the focus shifted in the 2000s to school accountability. This shift induced a reconstruction of the “risk” posed by the earlier round of reform and the identification of aspects of organisational learning to be retained or discarded. Such an ability to choose is an important indicator of organisational capacity for reform. The next round of reforms should include academic supervision in the accountability mandate.

Is Son Preference Weakening?

The National Family Health Survey data indicates that the index of intensity of son preference, a crude measure based on attitude, has declined—so has the measure based on behaviour. The share of those who have accepted daughters-only families has increased from 5.15% to 6.65% from NFHS-1 to NFHS-3. Daughters-only couples are concentrated in the southern states of India and are typically urban, educated, and upper-caste, with high living standards. Sex ratio at birth figures for 2007–12 highlight the decline in the number of missing girls to 3.3 lakh per year from 5.8 lakh earlier. Is son preference weakening? Is the Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act a contributing factor?

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