ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Arms Production in Third World-Reality, Myth and Nightmare

Arms Production in Third World Reality, Myth and Nightmare Dipak Ghosh Arms Production in the Third World by Michael Brzoska and Thomas Ohlson (eds); Taylor and Francis, London and Philadelphia, 1986;

Administrative Style and Government Purpose

A P Saxena The administrative apparatus along with its systems and procedures is becoming complex, even cumbersome. At the same time the rising expectations of the people at large make it increasingly clear that expeditious achievement of government purpose is crucial, which in turn is related to administrative style. The article suggests a package of measures to minimise the situation of dissonance and promote increasing convergence between administrative style and government purpose.

Experiment in Workers Management-Sonali Tea Garden, 1973-1981

Sonali Tea Garden, 1973-1981 Ratna Sen This article deals with an experiment in workers' management of a tea garden in the eastern region of India. While the experiment related informal terms to the creation of a co-operative for take-over of a tea estate abandoned by its owners, the main point of interest is the efficient management of the garden by the workers who nursed it back from a point of sickness to a position of health without any of the traditional accoutrements of management.

New information Technologies and Developing Countries-Implications for Human Resources Development

Developing Countries Implications for Human Resources Development Dieter Ernst Private firms based in the major OECD countries are under increasing pressure to expand the worldwide proliferation of their technologies, penetrate or at least retain increasingly protected markets and spread (he excessive cost burden of research and development. On the other hand, the process of transferring and disseminating technology, once started, is increasingly eroding the capacity of these very firms, including the most powerful multinational corporations, to control this technology, i e, to remain in a position of technological dominance.

Delhi Textile Strike-Implications of Linking Wages to Productivity

Implications of Linking Wages to Productivity Sharat G Lin Following the precedents in Bombay and Coimbatore, the Delhi textile strike has once again raised the issue of linking wages to productivity. In practice the major impact of such provisions is not to increase production through incentives to workers, but rather to enable management to rationalise reductions in workforce in order to reduce the man-machine ratio. Unlike in Tamil Nadu where labour productivity in the cotton textile industry is rising, in Delhi it is decisively declining. This means that if present trends continue and wages are linked to productivity, real wages may be expected to decline in Delhi. This is only a part of the broader dilemmas faced by a dying industry.

Health Information Systems in India

S K Sanyal The efficiency of any information system depends on a correct assessment of data requirements based on an appraisal of the demands made by individual users and on the methodologies adopted in collection of data, Health is a resultant of a multiplicity of factors and these put great demands on the information system that could be visualised for the health sector ft not only implies a wide base of information with inter-sectoral linkages, but a close monitoring of the progress made in the improvement of the health status. The paper outlines a framework of an information system for assessing and monitoring the level of health.

Productivity and Monetary Incentives-Indian Experience

Indian Experience Subratesh Ghosh Since the sixties there has been widespread controversy, based on studies conducted mostly in the advanced industrial countries of the west, on the role of monetary incentives in motivating workers to better work efforts and consequently raising productivity This paper examines the role of money as an incentive to work performance in India, which is taken as a representative case of the overpopulated developing economies in the third world.

Labour and Management-First Twenty Years of Assam Company Limited (1839-59)

First Twenty Years of Assam Company Limited (1839-59) Kalyan K Sircar Not much work has been done on the labour-management relations in Indian industries of an early period when there were no formal trade unions, political parties or special labour legislation as such to mediate This paper enquires into the conditions prevailing in the plantation industry during its formative years, 1839-59. In those days, the Assam Company was the sole representative of this industry in India, and recruits from the Kachari tribe of Assam accounted for, unlike in later times, most of its labour force. Because of ethnic homogeneity, proximity of the plantations to their home districts and the free mobility they enjoyed, the Kachari labour force was often able to fight back and gain important concessions from the Company management. Themselves illiterate though, they made continuous efforts to settle wage rates and disputes through collective bargaining and to obtain written undertakings from the management Keen on pushing the wages further down and on resisting labour combination, the Assam Company therefore decided after 1859 to recruit the bulk of its labour from outside Assam and keep (hem bonded. To facilitate this, the colonial government introduced restrictive labour legislation, thereby permitting the planters to restrict free mobility and right to combination of their labourers. Kacharis opted out of the new indenture system, even as famine-stricken people by thousands were recruited thereunder from new labour catchment areas outside Assam, during the decades that followed. Among, such new recruits were various groups of tribesmen, designated in the records as 'hill cooli, dhangar and boonah (jungle-dwelling), etc.

Corporate Investment in 1986-A Forecast

A Forecast R H Patil Ranjana Pendharkar This paper attempts to make a forecast of the growth in private corporate investment in 1986. Corporate investment covered here includes gross capital expenditure of all companies in the private and joint sectors. The level and Composition of corporate investment in 1985 is also presented here.

Accountability of Government Audit in India

K P Joseph There is a delusion among the officials of the Audit Department and some academics and government officials that our Audit is among the best in the world and many professional people in other countries also seem to share this opinion. This impression is based on an insufficient study of our procedures and practices and a failure to take notice of contemporary government audit trends in other advanced countries.

Mass Banking Management Problems

R Bandyopadhyay Before one can examine the management processes and problems arising out of mass banking, attention needs to be focused on the character and conceptual foundations of mass banking. An attempt is, therefore, made here to examine the nature and content of mass banking in India, with special reference to its need and linkage to the process of development. Later the nature of the managerial problems that mass banking has thrown up and ways and means of tackling them are analysed.

Interest Cost and Rate of Profit in Indian Corporate Sector

in Indian Corporate Sector K A Menon Study of the behaviour of the average rate of interest or the share of interest cost in the value of production and value added, though important in itself, does not provide conclusive evidence of the nature of the interest burden borne by industries. This paper seeks to assess the interest burden on the corporate sector against the accepted norm of marginal efficiency of capital. Data for the study are taken from the analyses of the finances of non-financial companies periodically conducted by the Reserve Bank of India and the ICICI.

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