ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Blue-Collar Worker-A Sociological Analysis

A Sociological Analysis Baldev R Sharma This paper examines the hypothesis that workers with an urban background are more highly committed to industrial work than those with a rural background. On the basis of a case study of workers in an automobile plant in Bombay, the author finds that this hypothesis, accepted for long by anthropologists among others, is not correct.

For Teachers Only

Review of Management November 1968 the reaction of the target audience and the final results could have been quite different. Media-wise the exclusion of film in this intra-media comparison appears somewhat surprising. The authors incidentally inform us that as many as 74 per cent in all six villages combined were found not to have seen any films. This may be largely became of the distance or accessibility factor. Dermanent cinemas being all situated THIS work is a largely unrevised memorandum submitted to the Education Commission which received evidence from 1964 to 1966. The memorandum was submitted in January 1966 and its value as a guide to India's educational future has been destroyed in a maelstrom of disastrous events; the devaluation of July 1966, the second successive poor monsoon and harvest in 1966-67 and, finally, the sharp fall in availability of non-project aid since the end of 1967, which is now likely to continue throughout the period of the revised Fourth Plan (1969-1974). The underlying assumptions of the education and manpower projections were based on the overall growth rates calculated in "Notes on Perspective of Development, India 1960-61 to 1975-76" and Pitambar Pant's 1965 revision and extension of these figures to 1986 in his Kale Memorial Lectures "Three Decades of Transition, India 1956-1986", Throughout the volume one searches in vain for the suggestion that the authors thought of testing the sensitivity of their assumptions to different overall growth rates (i e, 5 per cent 5.5 per cent, and 6.0 per cent a year). Did they really think in the autumn of 1965 that 6.6 per cent a year was the most likely growth rate for the Indian economy between 1960-61 and 1975-76? It is also disturbing that there is no justification at all of the choice of 20 years as the projection time period. The uncertainty of long-term planning in developing economies might have influenced the authors to limit their projection to 10 or 15 years. The authors do concede that "Estimates of economic growth over long periods are in the main town, But in the experience of commercial houses who have either used touring talkies or gone into village interiors with mobile vans, the film with its vivid combination of sound and sight has proved to be an extremely effective medium of communication, breaking as it does the barriers of literacy and language, of old habits and attitudes. In a serious painstaking study such as the authors have under- necessarily tentative, and it is hard to judge their implications for employment". In the event, all speculation concerning the empirical value of the projections has ceased a mere two and a half years after the memorandum was submitted. The Indian economy is extremely unlikely to grow at 6.6 per cent a year from 1960-61 to 1975-76 even if a persistent agricultural miracle manifests itself.

Profit Reporting by Diversified Companies

S K Bhattacharyya The recent emergence of a large number of conglomerate companies with diversified product lines is largely due to acquisitions of other companies and the setting up of new activities as divisions within existing companies, Initial official opposition to such diversification has been overcome by court rulings and the attractions of higher profitability.

Share Prices, Dividends and Earnings

S C Srivastava Retained earning has no significant influence on the determination of share prices in India, To thai extent investment in shares does not appear to be growth-oriented.

Motivation for Action

Sanat Lahiri Communications in India: Experiments in Introducing Change by Joseph E Kivlin, Prodipto Roy, Fredrick C Fliegal and Lalik K Sen, National Institute of Community Development, Hyderabad, 1968; pp 56; price Rs 4.

An Export Bank

Motivation for Action Sanat Lahiri For Teachers Only Angus Hone Blue-Collar Worker Baldev R Sharma Demand Forecasting D N Sen Gupta Profit Reporting S K Bhattacharyya Share Prices and Earnings S C Srivastava Review of Management, is published four times a year, on the last Saturday of February, May, August and November.

Predatory Capitalism in Indian Agriculture

Daniel Thorner "Welfare Capitalism" is the principal positive recommendation for agriculture offered by Gunnar Myrdal in his important treatise, "Asian Drama". Yet his own analysis of the agrarian scene in con- temporary India suggests that the type of capitalist farming most likely to spread is predatory rather than welfare-oriented. It follows logically that Indian agricultural workers can promote their own welfare best by organising themselves into powerful labour federations.

More on Returns to Scale in Indian Agriculture

Ashok Rudra In an earlier article in this journal the author had presented some farm level data that failed to indicate any dependence of yield per acre on farm size. He had suggested that since it has been claimed that the aggregated Farm Management data reveal an inverse relationship between size and yield, it should be examined whether there was something in the aggregation process that had given rise to a spurious statistical relationship.

Research and Extension for Farm Improvement

K C Naik R Dwarakinath It is not through proliferation of extension staff that the farmer can be helped to raise yields but by making the extension staff work with the latest knowhow in a climate that subordinates all other activities to legitimate tasks of extension work.

The New Strategy- Lessons of First Three Years

The impression is widespread that areas covered by the High-Yielding Varieties Programme are given favoured treatment, in fact, there is very little to distinguish the State Governments' agricultural activities in these areas from those elsewhere, except possibly some preference shown in distribution of fertilisers.

Productivity Trends in Large-Scale Industries

Raj Krishna S S Mehta No matter what indicator is used, it is clearly established that productivity has been declining and average cost of production rising in large-scale industries during the two decades 1946 to 1966.

Not by Inputs Alone

Predatory Capitalism Daniel Thorner Growth Rates V V Bhatt Lessons of New Strategy V S Vyas New Strategy Revisited Ralph W Cummings, Jr Robert W Herdt, S K Ray HYVP for Rice S Sengupta, M G Ghosh Research and Extension K C Naik, R Dwarakinath Size and Yield Ashok Rudra Crop Estimates V M Rao, N S Shetty S A Shetty Review of Agriculture is published twice a year, on the last Saturday of October and April.

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