ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Estimates of Farm Income in India, 1951-52 to 1967-68

 During the last few years, the agricultural sector has benefited from a high level of prices which has turned the terms of trade in its favour. Quantitative assessment of the impact of this factor on incomes of farmers and on incomes of various size-groups of farms is not all available.

Marketing Margins in Cotton

This paper attempts, on the basis of the findings of a survey undertaken by the authors in Dhulia and Jalgaon districts of Maharashtra, to examine the performance of the present marketing system in cotton with reference to the cost of marketing.

Intra-Sectoral Dualism and Agricultural Growth

In the theories of economic growth it is now usual to refer to a dual economy, i e, an economy with an advanced or modern sector as well as with a backward sector. The situation envisaged is that the economic system of an underdeveloped country may be divided into two sectors

Managerial Ideology in India

Although in Indian management circles, as in the West, ideology is a bad word, most managers tend to hold certain beliefs in common, both regarding the economic and social situation in which they operate and their self-image as 'engineers' of change and growth.

Rate of Return in Engineering Industry

This paper attempts to develop a simple method of estimating the marginal productivity of capital from balance-sheet data. Three conclusions follow from the analysis:

Management Education-A Perspective for its Evaluation

A Perspective for its Evaluation S K Roy TOWARDS management development, the three major inputs are: management education and training, organisational research, and management consultancy. 1 In a given business and industry setting, each one of these inputs would have its characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In India we have been overly enthusiastic about the first and the most pedagogic of these inputs, viz, education and training. Neither our management institutions nor our business and industry have adequately em- phasised either research or consultancy as instruments for management development and organisational change. At the same time, given a limited resource allocation, we probably need to view these inputs now in definite means- and-ends relationships.

Data Gaps Facing Business Economists

/f practising economists in India were asked to rank the major hazards of their profession, "data gaps' would perhaps receive the highest score. The ease with which business economists in the more developed, countries ban lay their hands on useful environmental data certainly has enabled them to play an influential role in their organisations.... A strategy for improving the data system should undoubtedly receive the higher priority in India.

Vintage and Flavour

Review of Management is published four times a year, on the last Saturday of February, May, August and November. Manuscripts intended for pub- licatlon should reach the Editor at least six weeks ahead of the date of publication.

Labour and the Green Revolution- The Experience in Punjab

Mechanisation of agriculture elicits sharp reactions where employment is a major problem. Its cost- benefit for any region has therefore to be carefully considered.

Capitalist Farming in India

Ashok Rudra (Review of Agriculture, September 27, 1969) tells us that he is more interested in the 'Red Revolution' than in the 'Green Revolution', The colour of the revolution which I have seen in one area after another of India in the 1960s is steel-grey. I call it an industrial revolution.

India s Surplus Cattle-Some Empirical Results

India's 'Surplus' Cattle Some Empirical Results C H Hanumantha Rao K N Raj, who has questioned the widespread assumption about the existence of a large surplus of livestock in India, raises the question whether given the amount of food available for maintaining cattle, a higher output is to be had by giving this food to a smaller number and raising their productivity or by distributing it over a larger number. He suggests that a firm answer to this question cannot be offered without much deeper investigation into the relative production functions.

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