ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Mechanisation and Rural Employment-With Some Implications for Rural Income Distribution

With Some Implications for Rural Income Distribution Martin H Billings Arjan Singh This paper attempts to infer the influence of technological changes in farm production methods on employment and income distribution among cultivators and agricultural labourers from a physical projection model. Although a less-than-perfect vehicle for such analysis, the model can provide insight into the pattern of labour displacement, its possible rate and the composition of displaced farm workers.

Organisational Planning in Banks-A Case Study

A Case Study Kalyan Banerji Commercial banks' branch coverage has vastly expanded in the last decade; large sums have been spent on establishment, and total staff has increased substantially. Banks have moved beyond the stage of borrowing and lending to a situation where the emphasis is on marketing financial services. The pattern of banking is becoming more complex as new activities are added in a chanzinz situation.

Decision Analysis Experiences and Expectations

V L Mote M Meenakshi Malya Are the days of management by hunch over ? Does a formal approach to managerial problems exclude judgment of experienced executives ?

Room for Impatience

Cost-Benefit of Management Education Samuel Paul Decision Analysis V L Mote M Meenakshi Malya Dynamic Concept of Marketing M Mohan Organisational Planning in Banks Kalyan Banerji A Consultant's View of Bank Management Henry A J Ralph Bank Portfolio Management C Rangarajan J K Satia Review of Management is published four times a year, on the last Saturday of February, May, August and November.

Management Education Social Costs and Returns

Samuel Paul This paper seeks to apply cost-benefit analysis to evaluating institutions set up for imparting management education. The major conclusions of the paper are twofold:

Bank Portfolio Management-A Linear Programming Approach

A Linear Programming Approach C Rangarajan J K Satia A linear programming model is presented here for determining the optimal portfolio of banks.

The Dynamic Concept of Marketing

M Mohan The marketing function has so far been viewed in a rather narrow sense. The emphasis is placed largely on production. This applies both at the Government level as manifested in the approach to planning and also at the implementation end of business and industry. The effort is oriented towards securing resources for production. The capacity of the market for the product In terms of its acceptance, specifications, variety and even price is taken for granted.

Scientific Bank Management-A Consultant s View

A Consultant's View Henry A J Ralph Banks in developing countries are often highly profitable, and may earn a higher rate of return on invested capital than their counterparts in the developed countries. But this profitable situation is the consequence of higher interest rates on loans, multiple fees incidental to granting of loans, low wages, and higher commissions for services.

The Trader s Comeback

Review of Agriculture is published four times a year, on the last Saturday of March, June, September and December. Manuscripts intended for publication should reach the Editor at least six weeks ahead of the date of publication.

The HYV Programme-Variables That Matter

Variables That Matter The main findings of the Programme Evaluation Organisation with regard to the HYP Programme in 1967-68 and 1968-69 are already available. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the findings of the latter year.

Agriculture in India in the 1970s

Notes 1 See 'The Development of a Dual Economy', Dale W Jorgenson, Economic Journal, June 1961, 2 For a detailed discussion of such problems in the Indian context, see 'Subsistence Sector in Indian Agriculture', V M Jakhade and N A Mujumdar, Reserve Bank of India Bulletin, September 1963.

Opportunities in the Green Revolution

Two opposite views have crystallised in the current debate on the indirect effects of the "new agricultural policy". According to one of these views, the policy is responsible for widening the gap, and for the growing polarisation, between the rich and the poor. The second view on the other hand holds that the most important indirect effect of the new policy has been the hastening of the process of modernisation of agriculture.

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