ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Economies of Scale or Advantages of Class-Some Results from a South Indian Farm Economy Study

Some Results from a South Indian Farm Economy Study Venkatesh B Athreya Gustav Boklin Goran Djurfeldt Staffan Lindberg The controversy over farm size and productivity' which began more than two decades ago is continuing unabated. It has important implications for the debate on agricultural development. The following case study of agricultural production in Tiruchi district, Tamil Nadu, is intended in part as a contribution to this discussion.

Development of Senior Administrators

A P Saxena Efforts for development of senior administrators have been either inadequate or ad hoc, lacking appreciation of key concerns including issues of need, objectives and content. In the meantime, the number of senior administrators in most developing countries needing intervention inputs for development has been steadily increasing with the growth in the pace of planned economic development.

Liberalisation of Automobile Industry Policy and Demand for Commercial Vehicles

and Demand for Commercial Vehicles Rajaram Dasgupta This paper attempts to estimate demand for different categories of commercial vehicles upto the end of this decade. The author contends that the official demand forecasts are exaggerated because the assumptions about growth of traffic on which they are based are unrealistic. In the light of his demand projection, the author argues that the current policies of licensing a number of new units is likely to result in underutilisation of capacity and consequent loss of economies of scale. A preferable policy would be to increase capacity in the existing units would achieve greater efficiency and introduce some competition in the industry.

Personnel Policies in Regional Rural Banks

Anil K Khandelwal The Regional Rural Banks (RRBs) were conceived as low-cost institutions to provide credit to small and marginal farmers and other down-trodden sections in the rural areas. Within a short span of a decade, the RRBs have carved out a niche for themselves among rural financing agencies. For the RRBs to achieve the tasks set for them will require highly motivated personnel and a climate which is conducive to development. However, issues of personnel policies for the RRBs have on the whole received scant attention. This neglect can prove costly in the long run. This paper is an attempt to put focus on this complex area and is divided into two sections: section I focuses on the problem areas in personnel management in RRBs and section II puts forward some suggestions for improvement of their personnel policies.

Compensating Government Employees for Price Increase-Basis, Trends and Forecasts

Compensating Government Employees for Price Increase Basis, Trends and Forecasts Poonam Gupta Sanjeev Gupta Does the existing policy of dearness allowance (DA) payments compensate government employees for price increase without introducing distortions in the pay structure? Also, by how much wilt the liability of the govern- ment increase by the turn of the century if present trends in DA payments are maintained? In this paper, the recommendations made by various pay commissions and other bodies on DA since its inception are summarised to bring out the underlying rationale. This is followed by a discussion of the present trends in DA payments. Subsequently, forecast of such payments by the Union government as well as different state governments upto the year 2000 are made. Conclusions are drawn in the last section.

Learning by Doing-Technology Transfer to an Indian Manufacturing Firm

Technology Transfer to an Indian Manufacturing Firm Shekhar Chaudhuri Tushar K Moulik This paper presents an in-depth case study of technology transfer to an Indian manufacturing firm in the tractor industry and highlights the complexities arising as a result of the interaction of a number of factors both external to the firm as well as internal to it.

On Benefits of Tapping Foreign Portfolio Investments-An Indian Perspective

Investments An Indian Perspective Vihang R Errunza Over the last two-three years India has moved towards selective liberalisation of rules governing foreign portfolio investment (FPI). It would be useful, therefore, to review the benefits of FPU especially as they pertain to India.

From Peasants and Tribesmen to Plantation Workers

Colonial Captialism, Reproduction of Labour Power and Proletarianisation in North East India, 1850s to 1947 Ranajit Das Gupta The plantation system, essentially an enclave economy, had some special requirements with regard to labour. These requirements led to the imposition of a particular mode of control and authority over its labouring population which in its turn imparted to the latter some qualitative characteristics which differentiated them from other segments of the wage earning labour force.

On the Implications of Rubin s Exposition of Abstract Labour

Exposition of Abstract Labour Ajit Kumar Chaudhury This paper extends the Marxian concept of abstract labour on the line proposed by Rubin. The object of the extension is to review the recent debate on the issue, and the related questions that follow, in the light of Rubin's treatment of the subject. The author's focus is on the qualitative value problem; the quantitative aspects are peripheral to the main thrust of this paper The paper is divided into three sections. Section II outlines the essentials of the Marxian concept of abstract labour as elaborated by Rubin. The limitations of Rubin's analysis are pointed out and possible modifications are examined. The implications of Rubin's analysis, in the context of the recent debate on value theory, have been worked out in section III.

Incorporation of Indian Subcontinent into Capitalist World-Economy

Capitalist World-Economy Immanuel Wallerstein This paper puts the case for perceiving the Indian subcontinent before 1750 as a zone largely external to the operations of the then Europe-based capitalist world-economy and to see 1750-1850 as the period during which it, along with many other parts of the world, was incorporated into the world-economy. It is argued that incorporation involved a restructuring of production processes and the creation of apolitical entity (or entities) operating within the rules of the interstate system. In the latter case, such an entity definitely does not have to be a colonial state. Indeed, in this period, the juridical structure of India was exceptional rather than usual, and the author has sought to trace the processess by which this exception occurred.

Agrarian Class Formation in Modern Bengal, 1931-51

Bengal, 1931-51 Saugata Mukherji Changes in the forms of credit or capital supply in Bengal agriculture in the thirties and the forties were ultimately reflected in the changing methods of land control and management. These developments of the thirties led to a sharp polarisation between the two segments of the cultivating population which was articulated as an acute conflict between the two classes over large areas of undivided Bengal by the following decade. This paper examines the causes and extent of the restructuring of class relations in Bengal, ft also looks at the situation of the labour force at the time of transfer of power and partition and the consequences of war time policies on the economy of the region.

Work Participation of Rural Women in Third World-Some Data and Conceptual Biases

Some Data and Conceptual Biases Bina Agarwal There continues to be little appreciation that problems of unemployment, poverty and destitution are in many instances gender-specific so that any serious attempt to alleviate these conditions and/or prevent their further aggravation would require a particular focus on the women of poor households. The accuracy of national level statistics, which usually serve as the principal data input in the framing of development policies, is severely impaired by biases which lead to an undercounting of women, both as workers and as those available for work. This paper seeks to spell out the nature and sources of these data biases and attempts to provide pointers on how they could be corrected and some of the data gaps filled.

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