ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Corporate Investment in 1986-A Forecast

A Forecast R H Patil Ranjana Pendharkar This paper attempts to make a forecast of the growth in private corporate investment in 1986. Corporate investment covered here includes gross capital expenditure of all companies in the private and joint sectors. The level and Composition of corporate investment in 1985 is also presented here.

Accountability of Government Audit in India

K P Joseph There is a delusion among the officials of the Audit Department and some academics and government officials that our Audit is among the best in the world and many professional people in other countries also seem to share this opinion. This impression is based on an insufficient study of our procedures and practices and a failure to take notice of contemporary government audit trends in other advanced countries.

Mass Banking Management Problems

R Bandyopadhyay Before one can examine the management processes and problems arising out of mass banking, attention needs to be focused on the character and conceptual foundations of mass banking. An attempt is, therefore, made here to examine the nature and content of mass banking in India, with special reference to its need and linkage to the process of development. Later the nature of the managerial problems that mass banking has thrown up and ways and means of tackling them are analysed.

Interest Cost and Rate of Profit in Indian Corporate Sector

in Indian Corporate Sector K A Menon Study of the behaviour of the average rate of interest or the share of interest cost in the value of production and value added, though important in itself, does not provide conclusive evidence of the nature of the interest burden borne by industries. This paper seeks to assess the interest burden on the corporate sector against the accepted norm of marginal efficiency of capital. Data for the study are taken from the analyses of the finances of non-financial companies periodically conducted by the Reserve Bank of India and the ICICI.

Concentration and Growth in Indian Tea Industry

Indian Tea Industry Neelanjana Mitra This paper examines the nature and extent of concentration in the Indian tea industry and compares the rates of growth of output of different size-groups of firms constituting the industry. Section II of the paper presents a picture of concentration in the industry in terms of two alternative measures of firm-size and compares the growth of production and acreage for different size-groups of firms. The discussion is then concluded in Section III with some policy prescriptions.

MAHARASHTRA-Social Basis of Sharing Irrigation Water-Central Issue in Well-being of Poor

 MAHARASHTRA Social Basis of Sharing Irrigation Water Central Issue in Well-being of Poor M D Sathe MAHARASHTRA is split up in two segments, separate and unequal. One is Bombay-Pune industrial zone (35 per cent) and the other is the rest of rural Maharashtra (65 per cent). In the latter again since the Sixties a small island of prosperity has come up around the canal based flow irrigation coupled with sugarcane cultivation and sugar co-operatives. The entire politics of Maharashtra revolves around this institutionalised power axis and the rest of rural Maharashtra is really held as a hostage. Thus the nature of conflict is essentially rural and unrelated to the over-developed urban Bombay metropolis.

Tribal Women in the Warli Revolt 1945-47-Class and Gender in the Left Perspective

'Class' and 'Gender' in the Left Perspective Indra Munshi Saldanha The historiography of popular struggles has subsumed women under the category of 'man' thereby ensuring their invisibility even while creating the myth of women's passivity This has given rise to the belief (hat men alone were capable of militant action, of leadership, of changing the course of events and, in short, of making history. Women, when mentioned at all, have been portrayed as followers or supporters in these struggles.

ANDHRA PRADESH-Charity Begins in the House

rich peasants in Pravaranagar area that there should be a well-defined public policy on the sharing of waters amongst sugarcane cultivators situated upstream and down-stream of a canal irrigation system. This is indeed a comic and curious situation since the demand for equitable sharing of water has precisely come from a lobby of rich peasants who are threatened for the first time in the last 35 years. This demand is symptomatic of the larger conflict on equity that will inevitably shape the politics of Maharashtra. Hence we have considered that the question of equitable sharing of gains of irrigation is not exactly a hypothetical one that can be put off to a more convenient future time, (iii) The next logical option is to equalise the rates of lift and flow irrigation. Once we accept the idea that the irrigation water should be shared over a large area and amongst a greater number of cultivators then this equalisation of costs becomes self- evident. It should be comparable to freight equalisation of steel over the entire country once steel is considered as a basic input of the industrialisation strategy. With this equalisation, the farmers who are situated beyond the command of flow irrigation canal system would have access to seasonal irrigation by way of lifting the water from the canal. This cost of lifting should be subsidised as a matter of public policy on equity.

Arya Samaj and Women s Education-Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Jalandhar

Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Jalandhar Madhu Kishwar The Kanya Mahavidyalaya in Jalandhar was set up in the 1890s in response to the need to impart to women a special kind of education which would enable them to adapt themselves to the new demands made by the educated men of the family without losing their cultural moorings. It was one of the most successful experiments of its kind as well as the most daring and radical in its innovativeness. Its founder, Lala Devaraj an Arya Samajist and his supporters most of whom were women, faced criticism and attack from conservative opinion both inside and outside the Samaj. The battles they fought and the way the internal contradictions in the Arya Samaj theory and practice were resolved are significant because they are typical of the legacy inherited by women's education today from its nineteenth century beginnings.

Kadambini and the Bhadralok-Early Debates over Women s Education in Bengal

Early Debates over Women's Education in Bengal Malavika Karlekar Debates over women's education in Bengal in the 1860s were broadly divided along the following lines: radical Brahmos felt that there was no justification for instituting a separate curriculum for girls or limiting the level to which girls should be educated; mainstream Brahmos and the more enlightened sections of the Hindus advocated a limited education for girls which would serve the major purpose of making women intelligent companions for the emergent bhadralok and better mothers for the next generation. The education of women, it was argued, involved a very different set of values from the rationale, for instance, behind agitating for home rule and, later, legislative representation. If women were excessively liberated there was no guarantee that they would either accept the moral straitjacket imposed on them or the sexual double standards allowed for men. These subconscious insecurities took a hysterical form occasionally as in the response to the educational and later professional successes of Kadambini, the first Indian woman doctor.

In Search of the Pure Heathen-Missionary Women in Nineteenth Century India

Missionary Women in Nineteenth Century India Geraldine H Forbes In the latter half of the nineteenth century British missionary women appointed by Ladies' Missionary Societies began to arrive in India with the expressed purpose of converting 'pure heathens,' i e, Indian women confined in the zenanas. In the zenanas they hoped to educate as well as to convert. The effort to convert was usually abandoned under the strict supervision of the male guardians of their Indian students. Even the real mission, to impart training, was hardly successful. The greatest impact of this plan was on the women missionaries themselves who, drawn from the 'surplus' of genteel single women in England, would otherwise have been competing for the few available positions of governesses. Significantly, women missionaries of the period were not only the helpmates of the imperialists but were themselves imperialists reenacting the drama of the coloniser and the colonised within the confines of the zenana.

Doordarshan s Neurosis

 Doordarshan's Neurosis Hiren Gohain EVERY educated Indian is now aware what a powerful and important medium the TY has become. He is equally apprehensive that this medium has fallen a prey to a series of serious maladies. Hence, when I received an invitation to attend the NAMEDIA seminar on 'Indian Television Today and Tomorrow', I accepted it with some alacrity. But on that fateful day when I joined the crowds at the appointed place and time in Guwahati, I felt acutely uncomfortable in the company of all the pillars of the establishment and could not help sneaking away with a sinking heart What I had intended to say on this occasion would have caused only blank incomprehension and anger among the assembled company.

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