ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The ‘Inside–Outside’ Body

In the context of the stand taken by the National Human Rights Commission of India on the Rohingya refugees, this article probes its location as an “inside–outside” institution. As an institution of “internal restraint” to exercise vigilance over the state, the commission is both constrained and empowered by the Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993, which brought about its existence, as well as its location within the domain of the state, which often reduces it to performing a legitimisation function. Yet, over a period of time, though unevenly and sometimes ineffectively, it has carved out triumphal moments that have opened up state actions to judicial and public scrutiny.

The Election Outlook in Karnataka

Karnataka will be going to the polls this year before May. Since 1985, every government, no matter its performance, has been voted out after one term. With the ruling Congress and the Bharatiya Janata Party gearing up for the battle at the hustings, this article looks at all the issues that can benefit or hamper their prospects.

FRDI Bill, 2017

Given the far-reaching nature of the changes it seeks to introduce within the financial system, the Financial Resolution and Deposit Insurance Bill should not be rushed through Parliament. Widespread apprehensions regarding provisions of the FRDI Bill, particularly the bail-in provision, have already forced the government to pause. It is only appropriate that an informed public debate precedes the tabling of this legislation for passage, which can signifi cantly alter the contours of India’s financial sector.

To Drink or Not to Drink—Is Not the Question!

Prohibition resurfaced as a major political issue, with the December 2016 Supreme Court judgment banning liquor sales within 500 metres of highways to counter drunken driving. However, the issue of alcoholism is complex and requires the framing of a comprehensive liquor policy that regulates, rehabilitates, and refocuses on the importance of awareness creation.

Sun Tzu’s The Art of War through the Prism of Political Realism

The ancient Chinese military strategist Sun Tzu’s treatise The Art of War has been likened to progenies of political realism such as Kautilya’s Arthashastra and Machiavelli’s The Prince. Although political realism as a school of thought in the discipline of international relations developed much later, there are points of similarities between Sun Tzu’s thinking and different strands of realism. This article uses the prism of political realism to view and understand Sun Tzu’s treatise. Such an analysis entails juxtaposing The Art of War with tenets of realism such as confl ictual nature of international relations; political morality as being distinct from personal/religious morality; anarchy as a systemic feature of international politics; preoccupation with power, security, and confl ict; and relative distribution of capabilities.

Gender Mainstreaming of Indian Corporate Governance Laws

The gender mainstreaming of Indian corporate governance laws is analysed in relation to recent legislative reforms concerning corporate social responsibility mandates, the one woman director requirement, gender wage equality and maternity benefits.

Identity, Contestation and Ethnic Revivalism among Nepalis in Darjeeling

Nepalis in India tend to be treated as outsiders and this has prompted the political mobilisation of Nepali identity and the ethno-linguistic movement for “Gorkhaland.” However, the struggle in the Darjeeling Hills is not for a single homogeneous identity, but a composite of diverse ethnic and caste entities. This article studies the fragmentation of ethnic identity within the movement, the resultant political changes, and the processes of negotiation in the quest for identity formation.

Resolving the Mahanadi Water Conflict

To chalk out the future course of action in view of the disputes regarding the use of Mahanadi river water, a well-rounded strategy that includes both the people and policymakers is needed. The strategy must allow for dialogue by rebuilding trust and should look at arbitration and negotiation as methods of conflict resolution. It is necessary to evolve a strategy that optimises the rational usage of Mahanadi water to benefit people from both Chhattisgarh and Odisha, coupled with the implementation of a multi-stakeholder forum that finds peaceful solutions and minimises areas of contention in a negotiable and consensual manner.

Recovering Memories of Partition

Are stories lost forever, and do personal histories count? In a world that has in recent decades seen immense change, with identities and even histories in flux, it also follows that “big events” shape “small lives.” But the manner in which every life comes about, how one’s history is shaped, has a bearing on the universal history that is then written about. Many a time, small histories are lost, and it is then that we must go in search for these other stories, using our own memory tools.

National Archives of India

The National Archives of India is the largest repository of historical documents in the country. In the 125th year of its establishment, this article traces the evolution of the archives, from an organisation that articulated the colonial administration’s power—subtly regulating and colonising not only the writing of history but also the minds of the colonised—to a postcolonial institution of preservation after independence.

A K Dasgupta on Gandhi and the Economics of Austerity

A K Dasgupta spent his lifetime teaching and researching on the classical, marginalist and Keynesian theories of value and distribution associated with the writings of Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Marshall and Keynes. In the last part of his life he was much attracted to the writings of M K Gandhi as well as the notion of austerity contained in the writings of David Ricardo and John Stuart Mill. The questions Gandhi had raised still continue to be astonishingly relevant. This article briefly explores this literature.

India’s Growth Rate

The discussions surrounding the Indian economy’s performance during the past three-and-a-half year rule of the National Democratic Alliance government have been entirely concerned with the ups and downs of particular year-on-year quarterly growth rates alone, and this amounts to missing the wood for the trees. This article attempts to contrast the notion of a growth rate that is normally employed in the growth theory with y-o-y quarterly rates for the Indian economy. It argues, in particular, that the policy failure (if any) associated with demonetisation cannot be judged with reference to growth rates.

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