ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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In Quest of Inclusive Growth

Economics needs an integrated approach for inclusive growth. But, this purpose is lost in the excessive focus on the separation of the subject into micro and macro and the obsession with rationality and general equilibrium for theoretical perfection. In such a context, the analysis of the factors contributing to the changes in the gross domestic product overlooks the distributional aspects, whereas statistics focuses on distribution in its search for approximating the regularity in data generated in a multivariate space. The feasibility of a new multidisciplinary framework for organising economic data in the quest of a paradigm inclusive growth is explored.

Food Subsidy in Cash or Kind?

The need for the public distribution system varies widely across states and districts. In some districts, the poor draw more than 80% of their grain from thePDS, but in other districts this share is less than 10%. A wide diversity of relationships with the PDS exist, suggesting a need for alternative modes of provisioning. A variable geometry of food provisioning might emerge, with cash working better for the needs of some districts and grain supply continuing to work better in other districts. Only a well-designed empirical test of the alternative modes will help ascertain the preferred shape of the PDS for a particular state or district.

HRIDAY in Amravathi

While the Andhra Pradesh government’s efforts to build a new capital city, Amaravati, is in national focus, a government scheme to preserve the heritage of a nearby village with a rich history is floundering. Amravathi, the imagined heartland of the Andhra people that the new capital seeks to represent, has received little benefit from the Heritage City Development and Augmentation Yojana, which has been plagued by failures in capacity-building and community engagement.

An Academic’s Response

The acceptance of the draft National Education Policy in its current form may prove disastrous for many of the gains made in education so far, at different levels. It will also mean an increased political control over educational institutions, undermining its stated goal of providing autonomy to them.

Unmoved by Stability

The electoral promise of transformational economic change had potentially played a role in the decisive victory of Narendra Modi, particularly in the 2014 general elections. In power, his government actively pursued macroeconomic stability and a business-friendly regulatory framework. However, the investment rate of the economy has actually slid, and has remained mostly at a level that is lower than what it was when the government assumed office in 2014. This outcome is interpreted as the result of the pursuit of macroeconomic stability, in the belief that it is conducive to growth, however it may be achieved.

Why India Needs a Crime Victimisation Survey

To be effective, policies on sexual violence against women must be evidence-based. In India, the National Crime Records Bureau publishes crime statistics based on first information reports. These constitute a useful summary, but do not provide policymakers the understanding to formulate a crime-fighting strategy. A national crime victimisation survey would supplement the NCRB data with critical inputs. Survey data could be used to further research in criminology and police reforms, assess the impact of punitive measures such as of the death penalty on the crime rate, and make informed decisions on legalising offences such as marital rape.

Debating the ‘After’ of Subaltern Studies

The exchanges between Partha Chatterjee and Dipesh Chakrabarty of the erstwhile Subaltern Studies group on the relevance of Subaltern Studies in contemporary times signify a conflicting understanding of how the “after” of Subaltern Studies is to be conceived. The divergent views on the “after” of Subaltern Studies, in turn, reflect the broader postcolonial debate, particularly on the question of the nature of the representation of the subaltern.

Amalgamation of Existing Laws or Labour Reform?

The Draft Labour Code on Social Security, 2018 of the National Democratic Alliance government was expected to reform existing labour laws and improve the state of the economy and labour. However, a close reading of the proposed code suggests that it is an amalgamation of existing laws, and the government has neither removed redundant provisions nor overhauled the existing provisions to make employment benefits available to employees in a quicker, simpler, and effective manner. The alteration of taxonomy and unification of older laws in the new code is likely to weaken the legal doctrine by destroying the comprehensibility of the law, and will lead to poor implementation.

Wave Theory

Studies on migration patterns amongst tribes in India have received less attention in the academic domain. As such colonial writings still remain the basis of explaining the migration of tribes in North East India, with the veracity of their arguments remaining unascertained. The Kukis’s unique pattern of migration is described and the formulation of a “wave model” to describe all migration taking place in a similar pattern is attempted.

Ageing Large Dams and Future Water Crisis

Ageing large dams are the blind spots of India’s water policies. More than 4,000 large dams reach the minimum age of 50 by 2050, preparing the ground for a future water crisis. The consequences and probable remedies of such a crisis are analysed.

Caste and Electoral Outcomes

Understanding the relation of caste and electoral outcomes merely in terms of arithmetic runs is fundamentally fallacious. It fails to factor in the element of mutual repulsion among castes and the multiplicity of hierarchies. Shift from caste as a system to caste as an identity makes caste-arithmetic explanations of election results all the more questionable.

In Pursuit of the Golden Deer

The trope of the golden deer is used as an entry point into exploring the ways in which alternative understandings of gender, varna–jati, the relationship between the forest and the settled world, and kingship were visualised in ancient India.

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