ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2016 and the Aporia of Citizenship

The 2003 amendment in the Citizenship Act provided the “hinge point” from which two contradictory tendencies, represented by the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2016 and the National Register of Citizens, emerged. First, a hyphenated citizenship associated with the NRC, which made citizenship contingent on conditions of descent specific to each state, and second, a national citizenship associated with the CAB which has made religion a principle of distinguishability in the creation of bounded citizenship. Paradoxically, these tendencies have become conjoined in the contemporary context, and coexist in a relationship of contradictory cohabitation.

Central Transfers and Tax Generation Efforts of Indian States

The impact of federal transfers on revenue collection by state governments in India in 1992–2013 is re-examined. Several overlooked aspects in previous studies that tested the asymmetric effect of transfers in India are addressed. When we disaggregate total transfers into conditional and unconditional transfers, we find that while tax collection decreases with an increase in unconditional transfers, conditional transfers seem to exert a positive influence on tax collection. The findings raise serious concerns regarding the pattern of intergovernmental transfers in India.

Sustainable Development through Diversifying Pathways in India

From groundwater depletion to toxic air pollution, modernising development pathways are linked with grave unsustainability challenges, as they extend the unbridled extraction of “goods” from nature while carelessly dumping back the “bads.” To move beyond this and to realise sustainable development, plural pathways may be required in each field, be it agriculture or housing. As outcomes of struggles for democracy and sustainability, these diversifying pathways may be structured around caring and cooperative (human–nature) relations.

Need for Restructuring the Tea Plantation System in India

Despite tea being a major plantation industry in India, tea estates are in a deplorable condition. Poor wage structure for labourers, absence of the developmental state, weak unions and worsening of welfare facilities are some of the factors contributing to the sorry state of affairs in the tea estates. The only way to bring a positive change is by dismantling the deep-rooted colonial structure and ethos of the plantations and thereby restructuring them.

The Future of Globalisation

An analysis of globalisation in a historical perspective can help us understand how the past or the present may shape the future. In so doing, this article outlines the contours of the present era of globalisation since its inception, circa 1975, to find that the successive epochs of globalisation during the second millennium came to an abrupt end because of their own consequences embedded in the process. Given this, the article seeks to focus on the present conjuncture, at the intersection of economics and politics, when globalisation is again in crisis to reflect on its future.

Caste and ‘Seeing Double’

Aniket Jaaware’s Practicing Caste: On Touching and Not Touching is a unique and somewhat audacious rendezvous with caste as thought and rethought through the “operation of touch.” The effort here is to explore some possibilities internal to this work so as to bring newer resources of thought to our discussions of caste in India/South Asia. Rather than combing through the entirety of the work in question, it is essential to capture the sense of vision that constitutes a part of the challenge of Practicing Caste .

Economic Independence and Social Security among India’s Elderly

Given that a majority of India’s elderly population lacks adequate social security or old-age pension, India needs a robust social security system that addresses decisive ageing challenges such as decent living arrangements, economic independence and social support to ensure active ageing. India needs to facilitate interstate convergence in old-age pensions under social security schemes for the elderly population, and revisit and re-evaluate existing multisectoral policy initiatives aimed towards their welfare.

Inclusive Fiscal Adjustment for Reviving Growth

Unrealistic revenue projections leading to strong expenditure compression is primarily responsible for India’s growth deceleration. Growth will decelerate further without a programme of deep fiscal adjustment. How a fiscal space, amounting to over 6% of the gross domestic product, can be freed through such an adjustment programme is demonstrated. This space can be potentially used for an inclusive public expenditure-led strategy for reviving growth.

Governing Mass Migration to Dhaka

For a clear framework of governance of population flow affecting Dhaka and its peri-urban areas, it is important to identify and distinguish the climatic and non-climatic issues. For the first set of issues, scientific data on sea level rise, salinity and the degree and frequency of natural disasters need attention, while the second set of issues requires an examination of the politics of exclusion and extortion, filling-up of wetlands, pollution and death of waterbodies, lengthy legal disputes on agrarian property and iniquitous access to pedestal natural resources like char (alluvial landforms).

Disrupting Boundaries of Politics in Kerala

By invoking the controversy around the March 2018 cover of the conservative Malayalam magazine Grihalakshmi , it is argued that there are certain paradigmatic shifts in how the imagined extents and limits of politics seem to be at the centre of a set of transformations in the dominant practices of media today. These practices have come to be shaped by a mode of imagining politics and politicisation as incessant and boundless, and as desirably so.

Easing Mumbai’s Suburban Train Congestion

Mumbai’s suburban trains have been plagued with the issue of overcrowding during peak hours. Big ticket projects—like the Mumbai Urban Transport Projects that have been funded by the World Bank—were implemented with the aim of creating new capacity and bringing down congestion in coaches during peak hours, but have failed to meet their stated per rake passenger targets. The folly of the singular focus on creating extra passenger capacity is highlighted and instead an integrated approach is suggested, wherein non-motorised transport infrastructure can take the load off the suburban system by weaning short-distance travellers away from it.

Can India Raise Its GDP Per Capita to $5,000 by 2030?

The ebbs and floods of investment and growth in the Indian economy in the past two decades are rooted in the movements in steel prices. Short-cuts used in the compilation of macro statistics obscure the policy debate by creating incongruous images: real investment growth is rising, but the rate of investment is sliding; doing business is easier, but business activity is growing slower. If policies are pursued to facilitate business activity, and better methods are used to measure it, India can raise its gross domestic product per capita to $5,000 by 2030 (from $1,965 in 2017).

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