ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Factory Statistics by Capital Size

Factory Statistics by Capital Size B V Mehta FACTORY SATISTICS in India have shown a slow but progressive improvement over the last few years. The first Census of Manufacturing Industries (CMI) in 1946 and the subsequent ones upto 1952 provided some useful statistical information on the working of the factory sector but did not present these data by size groups. It was not until 1953

Demand Projections

nesses. Any information at all on the subject would be of far greater value and relevance than, for instance, his accounts of the different types of entertainment establishments in the United States of America. Nor, however, fascinating they may be. are the relative divorce rates for different occupations in that country really necessary.

Demand Projections

nesses. Any information at all on the subject would be of far greater value and relevance than, for instance, his accounts of the different types of entertainment establishments in the United States of America. Nor. however, fascinating they may be, are the relative divorce rates for different occupations in that country really necessary.

Prospects for Aid

Prospects for Aid WHATEVER ELSE one may say about the World Bank, it cannot be denied that of all the international institutions which have proliferated in recent years, the Bank displays the most intelligent concern for the development of the poorer countries. It need not have been so; the Bank could have adopted a passive role after post-war reconstruction. But the needs of the developing countries have given the Bank a new role as a powerful intermediary between the developed and the developing nations. In India, we may resent the Bank's pressure for devaluing the rupee, but equally one should commend the unequivocal speech of its President, George Woods, to the recent Ministerial Meeting of the Development Assistance Committee of the O E C D. He told the O E C D countries that the degree of assistance they are providing "is inadequate by any reasonable standard

Prospects for Aid

Prospects for Aid WHATEVER ELSE one may say about the World Bank, it cannot be denied that of all the international institutions which have proliferated in recent years, the Bank displays the most intelligent concern for the development of the poorer countries. It need not have been so; the Bank could have adopted a passive role after post-war reconstruction. But the needs of the developing countries have given the Bank a new role as a powerful intermediary between the developed and the developing nations. In India, we may resent the Bank's pressure for devaluing the rupee, but equally one should commend the unequivocal speech of its President, George Woods, to the recent Ministerial Meeting of the Development Assistance Committee of the O E C D. He told the O E C D countries that the degree of assistance they are providing "is inadequate by any reasonable standard

IADP What Holds It Down

Report of the Expert Committee on Assessment and Evaluation of the Intensive Agricultural District Pro- gramme, Government of India, 1966. THE EXPERT COMMITTEE appointed by the Government of India, with S R Sen as Chairman, for assessing and evaluating the Intensive Agricultural District Programme, has recently submitted its second Report. The Report is now available in mimeographed form. The I A D Programme was launched in 1960-61 and the present report covers its operation for 5 years for which period the Programme was originally conceived. In the first Report prepared in 1963, the assessment and evaluation of only the first group of seven districts were undertaken while the present one deals with all the 15 districts that have so far been brought under this programme. Since the I A D Programme is the king-pin of the current agricultural strategy of the Government, the report needs careful study.

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