ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Writing Resistance, Revisiting Ruptures

Most ethnographies of resistance are found to be around the issues of ethnicity and indigeneity. This article attempts to interrogate this encounter by analysing two ethnographic works - In the Belly of the River by Amita Baviskar and Of Revelation and Revolution by Jean and John Comaroff - which consciously attempt to move away from the earlier traditions of "studying" cultures that were often seen as timeless on the one hand, and as predecessors of modern civilisation within a linear evolutionary paradigm, on the other. Both of them attempt, instead, to historicise cultures and identities.

Cropping Patterns and Risk Management in the Flood Plains of Assam

The recurring floods in Assam cause instability in agricultural production. To avoid crop losses due to frequent floods many farmers have adopted a risk-averse strategy by an appropriate combination of crops. This has led to a decline in the acreage share of kharif foodgrains and a corresponding increase in rabi foodgrains and vegetables. This article explores if such a strategy is spread over the whole state or is restricted to a few pockets. It also analyses how and to what extent flood proneness has influenced the choice of cropping pattern of the farmers of Assam.

Resistance against Polavaram

A discussion of the resistance of the local tribal population against the construction of the Polavaram dam on the Godavari in Andhra Pradesh, the main feature of which is the involvement of various people's organisations that have been supporting several forms of protest by the adivasis.

Water Management for Irrigation in Kerala

With the growing threat of food insecurity and a largely erratic rainfall pattern, Kerala, despite its very high rate of annual precipitation, has embarked on a series of large budget irrigation schemes. However, with the shift in acreage in favour of certain cash crops which demand relatively less moisture, the requirement of water in agriculture may change. This paper finds, after estimating the total water required for irrigation purposes in Kerala, that the state government need not pump a huge amount of funds into major irrigation projects.

Sovereign Debt Crisis in Greece: Is There a Way Forward?

The International Monetary Fund package for Greece is likely to make things worse, not better, for the beleaguered economy. And as other European economies show similar signs of a sovereign debt crisis, the situation does not bode well for Europe and the world economy.

Climate Refugees: Implications for India

There is as yet no agreement on the status of people displaced by climate change and the term "climate refugees" has no place in international law. While refugees are supposed to be people who cross national borders, climate change is seen to induce people to move within their countries. And even if climate refugees are recognised, who is going to be responsible for their protection and rehabilitation?

Tribal Agriculture: The Chuktia Bhunjias in Central India

Primitive tribal communities like the Chuktia Bhunjias living in Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh and Orissa continue to practise traditional agriculture using bio-cultural resources. Policymakers must learn from them in order to challenge the conventional model of agricultural production and food insecurity, as also about how to make development sustainable.

New Forms of Urban Localism: Service Delivery in Bangalore

Residential welfare associations are a window of opportunity to consolidate loose networks of local associations engaged in activities around urban services. They have changed the dynamics of urban politics. This article attempts to trace how, while working in an increasingly globalised and polarised city like Bangalore, these groups demand a better quality of life and more equality for their members. It also assesses the collective urban practices through which individual grievances are redressed.

Indian Investment Treaty Programme in the Light of Global Experiences

An exponential growth in bilateral investment treaties, accompanied by an increasing number of investor-state investment disputes has given rise to two global issues. One, the relationship between the number of such treaties and investment inflows, and two, concerns over the compromise of regulatory discretion due to obligations imposed. In the Indian context, the most important regulatory framework on foreign investment - the Press Note 2010 - does not even mention the standards contained in Indian BITs. This article makes a case to critically examine the Indian BIT programme in the light of these issues.

Big Dams and Protests in India: A Study of Hirakud Dam

This article examines the movement against the construction of the Hirakud dam in Orissa. It is evident that the domestic resistance to the project was variously compromised by nationalist rhetoric, imperatives of state development and absence of transnational support. The Hirakud dam project has failed on all of its objectives - flood management, hydropower production, irrigation and navigation. Its socio-economic impact has been devastating.

Agriculture in a High Growth State: Case of Gujarat (1960 to 2006)

Theories of structural change suggest that the share of the agricultural sector will fall in course of economic growth, while agricultural incomes are expected to rise. This paper examines the hypothesis and analyses the role of agriculture in Gujarat. Agricultural production is still fluctuating, resulting in low and fluctuating agricultural incomes. High growth rates in other sectors have not generated commensurate growth in agricultural incomes. Significant constraints on private investment in agriculture exist, creating an efficiency case for public investment. The issue of stagnant agricultural incomes presents an argument for public investment in agriculture on distributive grounds.

Engendered Freedom: Partition and East Bengali Migrant Women

 Engendered Freedom: Partition and East Bengali Migrant Women Archit Basu Guha-Choudhury Partition displaced millions, who left their homes in search of their religious identity and traversed a course that marked the less idealistic reality of hardship and alienation. Whether Hindu or Muslim, each one bore the burden of adjustment Partition brought with it.1 Unfortunately for Bengal, its tryst with fragmented lands and lives did not officially end until 1971 when Bangladesh was born.2 Throughout this period the weaker sections of society wrote their own stories of

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