ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Locating Lohia in Feminist Theory

The general populace, academics, and feminists in India have been largely oblivious to Ram Manohar Lohia's liberating thoughts on Indian women. This article points out that their relevance has not diminished with the passage of time as the patriarchal domination of Indian women, enmeshed in a pernicious caste system riddled with class divisions, continues. Summarising Lohia's radical and insightful position on the subjugation of Indian women and the ways he suggests for their emancipation, this article makes an attempt to locate his thoughts in the variegated landscape of feminist theory.

Jammu and Kashmir

A constitution is the legally permitted matrix for exercise of power and access to power. The Constitution of India is a federal constitution that establishes a dual polity, which consists of the union at the centre and the states at the periphery, each endowed with sovereign powers assigned to them by the Constitution. Jammu and Kashmir, however, stands out as the only state in the Indian union that is not governed by the general scheme of distribution of powers. A special departure was made, defi ning what powers ought to belong to which government, which perhaps leans towards a more confederal than federal arrangement.

FDI in India

This article examines the pattern of foreign direct investment infl ows in India through three periods: (1) 1969-75, when the policy regime was "anti-FDI", (2) 1975-91, when promotion of FDI was "selective", and (3) after 1991, when the policy regime is "pro-FDI". It shows how the ideas and interests of different political groups have affected the institutional changes that have infl uenced FDI infl ows. It also suggests that competition between provincial states has positively contributed to the growth of FDI infl ows since the economic reforms of 1991.

Climate Change, Uttarakhand, and the World Bank's Message

The devastation in Uttarakhand in June 2013 showed that some of the effects of climate change are already upon us. It ought to serve as a wake-up call to desist from a development model that upsets fragile ecosystems on a large scale and impoverishes people who are already highly vulnerable to a wide range of social and economic problems. This article points out that we need to heed the consequences of climate change projected in a new report by the World Bank and think of viable ways to tackle the challenge ahead.

Underestimation of Suicide

Reliable suicide statistics are a prerequisite to understanding vulnerability to suicide, its monitoring and prevention. The present study examines the existing offi cial suicide estimates, which are compared and analysed with fi eld data collected from the Dibang Valley and Lower Dibang Valley districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The study validates the reliability of offi cial data and addresses the issue of underestimation of completed suicides in the study area.

Double-Digit Inclusive Growth

India aspires for a double-digit growth rate. For that, agriculture will have to grow at least 4% annually to support gross domestic product growth rates in excess of 8% if we are to constrain imports at slightly higher levels than at present. Such agricultural growth can be attained with a total factor productivity growth rate of 2%, along with developing the net irrigated area to 90 million hectares. But in the past two decades, agricultural growth has been less than 3% and productivity growth has been lower than 2%. Surface irrigation has not grown and groundwater is being overexploited in many parts of the country. Achieving the required agricultural growth for double-digit growth of the economy is a signifi cant challenge.

Human Rights, Honour Killings and the Indian Law

This article argues that in the absence of normative criteria that can identify a set of universal human rights, the "right to have constitutional rights" can take on the onus of being that universal human right. In the case of honour killings, the right to have and, more importantly, access legitimate fundamental and legal rights is under severe doubt. A universal standard framework - such as a reading of "right to have rights" would have it - justifies the very purpose of human rights itself. The origin of human rights, thus, shifts from the matter of "being human" to a matter of social, political and legal constructivism.

Conceptualising Indian Diaspora

This article attempts to provide a framework for understanding the Indian diaspora, which encompasses a diverse set of people living outside India. This diversity is not only a representation of the plurality of Indian society and heterogeneity in the phases and patterns of migration, but also emerges out of the host country variations. However, regardless of this diverse framework, the Indians in the diaspora derive a commonality from their Indian origin, thus making their identity a play between the divergences and the unifying Indian stamp.

A Robust and Forward-looking Industrial Production Indicator

Against the backdrop of growing criticism of the index of industrial production, which provides information only about the past and sometimes fl uctuates wildly, this article seeks to provide a more robust and forward-looking economic indicator of industrial growth. Such an indicator, based on past IIP numbers, can also serve as a benchmark for future IIP numbers when they are released. Using data on the IIP's three sub-series - manufacturing, mining, and electricity - it seeks to isolate the "noise" from the "signal" in two steps, enabling predictions for the two past months and four months into the future using the latest available IIP numbers in any given month.

Bureaucratic Literacy and the Politics of Complaint

While analysing the Dhanka's scheduled tribe status in Rajasthan, this anthropological account sheds light on the complications faced by the members of this backward community while they struggle to access their legal rights with insufficient means to access the institutions that are supposed to ensure these very rights.

Cultures of Violence

Based on the story of Manisha, a homeless mentally-ill woman who met with an untimely end in a mental hospital, this article raises questions about the cultural practices of the scientific-medical paradigm, the state legal system, and society that allows a vulnerable woman to vanish without a trace. It ponders the ways in which we can talk about the cultures of violence even in apparently benevolent institutions, and how science and the law are complicit in the violence that takes place in the name of helping the helpless.

Shadow Banking in India and China

Shadow banking has always played a part in India and China to meet credit needs not catered to by the formal banking sector. This article argues that financial liberalisation and deregulation have seen shadow banking institutions in both countries becoming more interconnected and more systemically important. India and China require better regulatory supervision based on the functions of shadow banks to reduce any scope of regulatory arbitrage even if this is at the cost of lower economic growth. Prudential regulation like Basel III is not of much help. What is required is better structural regulation of shadow fi nancial institutions to curb their explosive growth.

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