A+| A| A-

Impact on Well-being and Experience of Further Violence

Access to Facilities for Women Experiencing Domestic Violence

In India, 29% of women aged 15–49 have experienced marital violence. Although crisis centres, known as helplines, exist to support those who experience violence, little is known about the experiences of women who use these services. Two rounds of surveys of 200 women who approached the government-sponsored helplines, conducted about four months apart, reveal that physical and sexual violence perpetrated by husbands and/or family members fell significantly in the inter-survey period. Women were also less likely to report suicidal thoughts and many reported a sense of economic security, happiness, self-confidence, and peace of mind. These findings underscore the importance of facilities offering women a haven in which they may learn about their options, have access to empathetic advocates, and secure support for addressing the violence they face at home.

Marital violence remains widespread in India, with 29% of women aged 15–49 having experienced physical or sexual violence (IIPS 2016a). Help-seeking for domestic violence is also limited, with only 24% of women who had experienced violence having sought help to end the violence (IIPS and Macro International 2007), a situation that, in turn, reduces women’s ability to prevent further violence. Furthermore, when help is sought, it is rarely sought from institutional sources. Fear of being beaten again, perceptions about the importance of maintaining the integrity of the family, and the low level of awareness about formal support services are common factors that inhibit women from seeking help from institutional sources (Jejeebhoy et al 2013; Shrivastava and Shrivastava 2013; Decker et al 2013).

The literature about help-seeking, in general, has affirmed that it is only when a problem is seen as undesirable and unresolvable without help from others that women will consider seeking help. Likewise, there is a close association between the severity of violence and help-seeking (Liang et al 2005). Help-seeking progresses from seeking informal support from family and friends to more public help-seeking as violence worsens. Indeed, in patriarchal settings such as India, women report incidents of violence and seek help only when violence reaches severe levels. For example, in a study of South Asian women living in the United States (US) who had experienced domestic violence, more than half had sought no help and only 5% had contacted a domestic violence programme, and that too only when violence was extremely severe (Raj and Silverman 2007). Also serving as obstacles to formal help-seeking are perceptions of poor quality of help, trivialisation of women’s problems, and limited efforts made by service providers to reach the perpetrator (Liang et al 2005).

To read the full text Login

Get instant access

New 3 Month Subscription
to Digital Archives at

₹826for India

$50for overseas users

Updated On : 23rd Apr, 2019

Comments

(-) Hide

EPW looks forward to your comments. Please note that comments are moderated as per our comments policy. They may take some time to appear. A comment, if suitable, may be selected for publication in the Letters pages of EPW.

This paper is a modified version of the MA dissertation submitted to the Indian Institute of Technology Madras by Sreelakshmi P. The authors...

This paper examines Manipur’s census statistics for the period between 1991 and 2011. It argues that conventional demographic factors cannot...

Has India deindustrialised prematurely, after three decades of free market reforms? Probably not. The manufacturing sector’s share in gross...

Using data from the India Human Development Survey, this examination of toilet possession and personal hygiene in India shows that the strongest...

The paper, in three parts, examines the question of lived experience and Dalit subjectivity in a caste society. The first part argues that the...

Careful research on the inflation targeting regime’s impact on anchoring inflation expectations, as well as an empirical examination of...

The Indian labour market is characterised by a high level of informality, with large numbers of workers in poorly paid “lower tier” informal jobs...

Geoffrey Bawa (1919–2003) was Sri Lanka’s most celebrated architect in the 20th century and his half-a-century long career shaped the nation’s...

Whether the “practising Adivasi” or the practitioners of traditional knowledge are subjects of different rationality is examined here. Through a...

The Indian tea economy is undergoing acute transformations, with the divestment of tea companies from plantations leaving thousands of plantation...

Back to Top