ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Intrigues of Indigeneity and Patriarchy in Khasi Society

Proponents of the Khasi Hills Autonomous District (Khasi Social Custom of Lineage) Second Amendment Bill, 2018 see it as a mechanism to protect the indigenous culture of the Khasi tribal community. However, critics from within and outside the community are describing it as a regressive legislation which will distort the matrilineal values of the Khasi society.

The passing of the Khasi Hills Autonomous District (Khasi Social Custom of Lineage) Second Amendment Bill, 2018 by the Khasi Hills Autonomous District Council (KHADC) on 25 July 2018 generated a lot of debate within Meghalaya in particular and the North East in general. The amendment of Section 2 of the principal act inserted a new subsection (r) after the subsection (q). The new subsection (r) defines “Non-Khasi” as “a person not belonging to indigenous Khasi Tribe classified as Schedule Tribe under the Constitution (Scheduled Tribe) Order, 1950.” After the existing Section 3(c), a new section 3(d) was inserted which states that

any Khasi woman who married a non-Khasi as well as her offspring(s) born out of such marriage(s) shall be deemed as non-Khasi who shall lose the Khasi status and all the privileges and benefits as a member of the Khasi tribe who cannot claim preferential privileges under any law.

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Updated On : 12th Mar, 2019

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