ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Looking Like the State

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The Economic & Political Weekly deserves our moral support for addressing the ethical issue of the “right to privacy” in the context of the recent Supreme Court judgment in the K Puttaswamy v Union of India case (Privacy after Putta­swamy, EPW, 23 December 2017). In her article titled “Privacy and Women’s Rights,” Aparna Chandra has rightly reminded us that “a person enjoys a degree of privacy even in public spaces.”

The above observation opens up the possibility of imagining “private” spaces in public institutions. The question that immediately crops up in one’s mind, in this context, is whether the installation of closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras in public institutions for the surveillance of employees can be interpreted as an assault on the right to privacy. In fact, other than state-run institutions, there are many non-state public institutions in India, which “look” like the state and which violate the constitutional rights of citizens, including the right to privacy and the right to live with dignity.

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Updated On : 19th Jan, 2018

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