ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Counting the Poor

Measurement and Other Issues

Since the submission of the report of the 2012 expert group on poverty measurement, there have been a few comments on it. The purpose of this note is to clarify some of the issues raised by researchers and others on this report. The clarifi cations discussed here are (1) what is new in the approach defining the poverty line; (2) the use of calories; (3) multidimensional poverty; (4) high urban poverty in many states; (5) NAS-NSS consumption differences; (6) poverty measures in other countries; (7) public expenditure and poverty; and (8) poverty ratio eligibility for access to programmes. As most of the researchers have commented on multidimensional poverty, this note also elaborates on the reasons for not considering this measure in the report.

In India, we have had a long history of studies on measurement of poverty.1 The methodology for estimation of poverty used by the Planning Commission has been based on the recommendations made by working group/task force/expert groups consisting of eminent experts in the field.

In June 2012, the Government of India appointed an expert group (with C Rangarajan as chairman) to take a fresh look at the methodology for the measurement of poverty. The committee submitted its report towards the end of June 2014 (GoI 2014).

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