ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Will the Postman Ring Twice?

Crowded out by modern communications technology, the Indian postal service may well be headed for extinction.

Ever since Lord Dalhousie, the Governor General of the East India Company, started the Posts and Telegraphs (P&T) service in the country in 1854, around the same time railway services were also introduced, India has had a long and enduring affair with the postman.

Most premises of the Postmaster General of India are named “Meghdoot Bhawan”, a literary flourish that harks back to the lyric classic of the Sanskrit poet Kalidas. Many of the post offices in the country are beautiful heritage buildings sited on prime land. The humble post office has also played the role of muse for playwrights, storywriters, poets and journalists. Tagore wrote a play called Post Office. Actor Dilip Kumar starred as a dak babu. Newspaper titles allude to the transmission of messages via the post office – Washington Post, Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph.

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