ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Publicly Talking about Caste

A Report on Jātisamvāda in Prajavāni

An unsual sociological experiment was conducted during the first half of 2013 in the Kannada daily Prajavāni to explore how we can collectively think about caste and through this ask whether it was possible for the public to challenge stablished beliefs about concepts such as caste, democracy and privacy.

We thank K N Shanth Kumar, Padmaraja Dandavathi, Executive Editor, and the editorial team at Prajavāni for their unstinting support. We also thank K V Akshara for the many discussions related to this project. The weekly production of the Jātisamvāda page as well as the online archive would not have been possible without the intellectual and professional support of N A M Ismail at Prajavāni and we are grateful to him for all his assistance. Madhava Chippali translated our articles into Kannada and his help is gratefully acknowledged.

An unsual sociological experiment was conducted during the first half of 2013 in the Kannada daily Prajavni to explore how we can collectively think about caste and through this ask whether it was possible for the public to challenge established beliefs about concepts such as caste, democracy and privacy.

An initiative to generate a public debate on caste experiences, titled jtisamvda, had its origins in the pages of EPW where the two of us explored the philosophical foundations of caste and untouchability as responses to each other (Gopal Guru, “Archaeology of Untouchability”, and Sundar Sarukkai, “Phenomenology of Untouchability”, 12 September 2009).

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