ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Climate Change, Forest Carbon Sequestration and REDD-Plus

The Conference of Parties-19 held in Norway in November 2013 ended with an announcement of a sum of around $280 million pledged by certain developed countries for a “results-based” payment system to take forward the programme of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation. This article examines what this means for climate change mitigation in the forest context, and what it probably means to India, specifically.

At the end of the Conference of Parties-19 (CoP-19) during November 2013 at Warsaw, Poland, the United Nations-Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD) organisation put out an eulogistic announcement of a sum of around $280 million pledged by certain developed countries (United Kingdom, United States, Norway, Germany) for a “results-based” payment system for REDD in 48 partner countries (India not being among them). The delegates made glowing statements about how great a breakthrough this was, and how it vindicated years of effort to arrive at a consensus and an action plan to take the programme of REDD (Plus) forward. This article attempts to tease out what this means for climate change mitigation in the forest context, and what it probably means to India, specifically. It should be of interest to the climate change interlocutors, policymakers, researchers, and especially, the Forest Services of India and of developing countries in general.

Principle of REDD (Plus)

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