ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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From 50 Years Ago: Congo and The Neutralists.

Editorial from Volume XII, No. 47, November 19, 1960.

It is symptomatic of the type of confusion and intrigue that have grown around the Congo question that, instead of clearing the air, as it should have done, Shri Rajeshwar Dayal’s Report has itself become the centre of a con-troversy. What is surprising is not that Belgium has found it embarrassing and, therefore, unacceptable; but that even the United States has given the appearance of questioning the findings of Mr Hammarskjoeld’s principal executive in Leopoldville. In other words a cold-war line-up has again begun to shape up... ...The West will try to rally support be-hind Brussels, while the Soviet bloc will sup-port Dayal, with the neutralists trying to play the tiring role of finding some via media between the two attitudes – even though it should be clear to anyone who sees the Con-go question in its proper perspective that, in this case, it is the Soviet Union which will be on the right wicket. Unless, therefore, the non-aligned powers display the unfamiliar ability to stand fully behind the Russians in this matter, they will themselves be undoing some of Dayal’s excel-lent work in the Congo…The non-aligned powers have almost hypnotised themselves, by an endless repetition of the boast, into believing that on all issues before the United Nations, their decisions and attitudes are governed by merit alone… The two main points brought out by Dayal in his Report are (a) the need to get rid of the Belgians in the Congo and (b) to take whatev-er steps may be considered necessary for re-activating the Congolese parliament…

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